Mok ying Ren Renne Ong Shaheed Alam

A good support goes a long way …

 

FUTURO SG – The 3M subsidiary rounds up their Futuro Ambassadors and three of our #ONEathlete(s), Mok Ying Ren, Shaheed Alam and Ren-ne Ong; and get them to share on their pathway as a successful competitive athlete! No flower blooms on its own, and they share who/what supported them thru their budding competitive sports endeavors.

 

“Surround yourself with people who support you. Find champions.”

– Sarah Gavron

 

Especially for athletes, you will notice that the common pattern is to share your goals and plans with your family and ask them to help encourage you to achieve the goals/plans. Consequentially, the ones closest to them are probably their biggest fans! They have seen the blood, the sweat, the tears, they have seen it all.

 

Now, with the next 6 videos, Futuro hopes to bring you a tad closer to our ONEathlete(s)!

  • We hope that each of their (Part 1) personal story video will be an inspiration to all aspiring athletes and a tribute to their fervent supporters.
  • We also hope that their (Part 2) quick exercise tips video will be a great information tool on techniques.
  • You also have some hampers for grabs (Part 3)! You can follow Futuro SG’s Facebook HERE.

 

Standby, your napkins, and click on the video links below:

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REN-NE ONG

Double SEA Games Bronze Medalist

National Shuttler

Managed by ONEathlete

 

“Whatever you do, do not regret!

– Ren-ne Ong

 

Part 1 : Get inspired with Ren-ne Ong

 

Part 2 : Preparation with Ren-ne Ong

 

Part 3 : Hamper Giveaway

What is your inspiration for keeping fit and playing sports?

Share with Ren-ne on the (below) Instagram post’s comments section and stand a chance to win 5 Futuro™ hampers, worth $100 each! … leggo guys! 

 


 

SHAHEED ALAM

ITF Junior Singles Title Winner

National Tennis Player

Managed by ONEathlete

 

“You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.”  

– Shaheed Alam

 

Part 1 : Get inspired with Shaheed Alam

 

Part 2 : Preparation with Shaheed Alam

 

Part 3 : Hamper Giveaway

What is your inspiration for keeping fit and playing sports?

Share with Shaheed on the (below) Instagram post’s comments section and stand a chance to win 5 Futuro™ hampers, worth $100 each! … Hit it now! 

 


 

MOK YING REN

Double SEA Games Gold Medalist

National Marathoner & Records Holder

Managed by ONEathlete

 

“Be patient and consistent in what you do”. 

– Mok Ying Ren

 

Part 1 : Get inspired with Mok Ying Ren

 

Part 2 : Preparation with Mok Ying Ren

 

Part 3 : Hamper Giveaway!

Caption this? Go to Mok Ying Ren’s Instagram below and post in the comment section! And stand a chance to win 5 Futuro™ hampers, worth $200 each!

 


 

ST: Taking a (sick) break from running

This article was first published in The Sunday Times on 28 October 2018

DR WANG MINGCHANG – You’ve meticulously drawn up a weekly training plan in the lead-up to your race, diligently following it and clocking the mileage. The weekend’s long run is coming as you near the end of the work week. But alas, your plans are blighted when you wake up with your throat feeling like sandpaper and your nose leaky as a tap. Undeterred, you carry on with your scheduled run, dismissing your symptoms as minor.

Should one continue exercising when one is ill?

The neck check

A neck check is a quick way to determine if you should continue to train/run when unwell. If your symptoms are above the neck, e.g. teary eyes, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or a mild cough, then it is probably okay to continue. However, if your symptoms occur below the neck, e.g. fever, chills, body aches, malaise, chest congestion, nausea/vomiting or diarrhea, then I would strongly encourage you to give your body a much-needed rest.

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Dr. Wang Mingchang advises that, depending on one’s symptoms, one can continue light running even on sick days. Photo credits: RUNONE

Running with a cold

Exercise may be beneficial when one is suffering from an upper respiratory tract infection, commonly known as the common cold. Symptoms include a runny or congested nose. Adrenaline, a hormone released during exercise, is a natural decongestant and helps in relieving nasal congestion as well as the widening of our airways. Research suggests that heart and lung functions (and hence exercise tolerance) do not appear to be altered by an upper respiratory tract infection. This means that the common cold will not affect your ability to run at your usual intensity. If you’re running in a group, do be mindful that sneezing or coughing in close proximity to others can lead to their not remaining your friends for long.

Running a fever? Do not run

Exercising with a fever is dangerous. Exercise further raises one’s body temperature and heart rate, which are likely already elevated, to begin with when one is having a fever. Our heart rate increases by about 10 beats per minute for every 1 degree Celsius rise in temperature. Running whilst febrile can result in excessively fast heart rates. Viruses are a common cause of fever and side effects may include inflammation of heart muscle. This inflammation, coupled with a fast heart rate,  presents much more stress and strain to the heart than the intensity of exercise would suggest. Ultimately, this can precipitate abnormal heart rhythms and, in severe cases, even result in sudden cardiac arrest and/or death.

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Photo credits: RUNONE

Protecting your immune system

It has been well-established that regular exercise can boost one’s immunity. On the other hand, too much exercise can have the opposite effect. Prolonged high-intensity endurance exercise (e.g. running a half or full marathon) can cause one’s immunity to be weakened for up to 72 hours. The cause is not clear but one plausible reason could be the excessive free radicals and stress hormones produced during intense exercise which can suppress one’s immune system.

If you find yourself frequently falling ill on the days after an intense training, it may be helpful to take in more foods that are rich in antioxidants, such as green tea, dark chocolate, blueberries, strawberries and beetroot as part of your recovery diet, to give your immune system a boost.

Sufficient rest and sleep are also needed for a healthy immune system. Depending on how fatigued you feel, it is prudent to always listen to your body and schedule a rest day or two after a session of hard running.

Dr Wang Mingchang
Dr Wang Mingchang is a Sports Medicine Associate Consultant with the NUH Sports Centre. He has completed around 10 full marathons and continues to train for distance running. 

The Gentleman Loser kissed Shaheed

26 Oct 2018 – Singapore’s first ITF Junior Singles Title Winner & #ONEathlete Shaheed Alam has an axe to grind with Kiss92 FM’s Jason & Arnold.

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As part of the new series The Gentleman Loser,  Shaheed was invited to spar with Jason on the tennis courts. Jason qualified that he has not been to the tennis court any more than ten times his whole life!

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Little grace was shown, but Shaheed was just adhering his brief by the SPH radio station to be “totally brutal.” No chances given then, as both Shaheed and Jason gamely put on their acting hats to play their respective roles as winner and gentleman loser. This entertaining video is now on Kiss92’s Facebook!

 

Shaheed was on air this morning to promote the video and, as Jason dug deeper, to share his experience with the beautiful female tennis pros who are now in Singapore for the WTA Finals. Shaheed was on the courts for their warm-up sessions.

 

20-for-20 is back!

“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving”

 

For active individuals, or athletes (recreational or professional), the importance of balance takes on a bigger and more significant role. For Ashley keeping this balance despite his hectic professional commitments and intense training schedule is key. Not to mention that he has remained free of training injuries since receiving chiropractic care in 2010, and knows only too well the importance of treading the fine line and keeping the balance as a professional athlete.

 

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Today marks 1 year (and 1 day) since practising as a Doctor of Chiropractic at Family Health Chiropractic Clinic! Extremely humbled to give, love, and serve all walks of patients while witnessing the fulfilment of their nervous system potential. Thank you mentor, colleague, and friend Dr. Kelvin Ng for this amazing journey of growth since your 2010 health talk in a bike shop (first time I heard the word "chiropractic"). Thank you @shermancollege as well for imparting us the philosophy, science, and art. Life is awesome when what you do resonates with your "why" 😊 Celebrated the occasion with @sandrafaustinalee by "shopping" at @asicssg and then having dinner. Now onto picking up Tiger the #RunnerDog from the @freemovementsg office! Photo credit: dad Andrew Liew. #FamilyHealthChiroSG #Chiropractic #ShermanPride #FindYourWhy #TeamASICS #IMoveMe #FreeMovementSG #Flexifitness #SingaporeAthletics

A post shared by Ashley Dominic Liew, DC, CACCP (@ashleyliewchiro) on

Professionally, Ashley is a trained Doctor of Chiropractic at Family Health Chiropractic Clinic. He is also a deep believer in taking care of the body dutifully so as to reap the full benefits of training. This includes paying attention to details, such as the effects of spinal alignment on leg length and how this has a knock-on effect on training injuries and running performance? With his credentials on and off the race track, Ashley’s training and medical philosophy is sound advice for runners (professional or otherwise).

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In conjunction with Family Health Chiropractic Clinic, Ashley has introduced a limited-time-only “20-for-20” deal for the first 20 runners who sign up by 31 Dec 2018. The 20-minute evaluation session will cost S$20 (before GST) and as part of this special deal, Ashley will be personally conducting an evaluation session for you. Here’s what you need to know:

  1. The evaluation session may take up to 20 minutes and includes a targeted case history, posture exam, leg length evaluation and summary of findings.
  2. All runners (recreational or competitive) are invited to partake in this evaluation
  3. Chiropractic evaluations, imageries (such as X-ray or MRI) and adjustments are not included in this special deal, which will cost S$20 (before GST)
  4. Please note that during the postural exam, the doctor may be required to place his hands on your hip joints and feet. Please inform the doctor if you are not comfortable with this.
  5. As this special deal is a no-obligation session, there is an option to add on a standard chiropractic evaluation (which includes any chiropractic adjustment as necessary). The S$20 fee for the 20-minute special deal session will then be applied to the standard first consultation fee of S$120 (before GST) for the chiropractic evaluation.
  6. Call Family Health Chiropractic Clinic at 6336 7714 to schedule your appointment in advance and ask for the “20-for-20” deal during registration.
  7. Terms and Conditions apply.

 

Family Health Chiropractic Clinic is located at 111 Somerset Rd, #08-03 TripleOne Somerset. Tel: 6336 7714. You may also wish to refer to their Facebook page for more info.

ONEathlete finish strong at the final TPS race!

14 October 2018 – The Performance Series 2018, now in its 3rd year, crossed its finishing line this morning, with its 4th race of the year. It had earlier held its races at Punggol Waterway (Apr), Pasir Ris Park (Jun), and Bedok Reservoir (Aug) before this final installment of the year at East Coast Park.

 

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The race – tagged on social media as #TranscendYourself – went on as planned, despite the heavy downfall and chilly weather on the early mornings of the Sunday. About 2000 odd runners had gathered in anticipation at the beach area after they were notified of the 15mins postponement in view of the weather. The 10km was flagged off at 7.45am with 3 of the #ONEathlete gunning for their best in the drizzle.

 

Ben Moreau led the pack of open-category participants throughout the race. He completed the 10km race with a timing of 32:38. Eventually, he was also awarded the trophy for being the 10km Overall Winner! It was no surprise that the British-citizen was ready to go for more, given his stellar performance in the recent Straits Times Run 2018 too!

 

His fellow ONEathlete(s), Banjamin Quek (35:52) and Ashley Liew (37:48) finished 2nd and 3rd in the Local 10km category, close behind Prashanth Silva. Both talents are in the midst of gearing up their training for the upcoming Standard Chartered Singapore Marathon 2018, in December.

 

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Opting for a slightly shorter race in view of his tight race schedule in October, was Evan Chee. He finished 4th with an unofficial timing of 18:38.

 

The local race that is organized by Just Run Lah, boasts of some key industry and community partnership, in addition to having Garmin as their title sponsor for the 2018 series! The race has also made significant efforts to raise the profile of local athletes by having a separate category for the local competitive runners.

 

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ONEathlete congratulates Just Run Lah on this feat, as well as, to thank them for this opportunity to see all its athletes on the podium this morning!

ST: Shredding my weight to go the distance!

This article was first published in The Sunday Times on 14 October 2018

BANJAMIN QUEK – When I was a primary school student, life was good – sedentary, and revolving around gaming and 3am suppers. Looking back, I was 68kg, 170cm, and neither very proud nor concerned about how my appearance. I was also encouraged, and offered, to eat more during meal times because that was how a traditional Asian family showed care and concern.

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Banjamin Quek in his younger days. Photo credits: ONEATHLETE / BANJAMIN QUEK

The turning point came when I was 13 years old and had just entered Secondary 1. I was deemed unfit (figuratively and literally) for my CCA (NCC Land) and that was my first real setback as a result of how I looked. I was sidelined during team games because no one wanted a player who couldn’t pull their weight. Needless to say, I did not have much success with relationships because of my ‘chubby’ appearance.

As a result, I became really upset because I felt unfairly judged based on superficial qualities. That got me started to read up more on food and nutrition and I realized how consuming food high in fats presents higher risks to our health and mortality.

Thus started my decision and journey to lose weight and lead a healthier lifestyle so that I would be able to fit into social circles and feel less inferior about myself.

DEVELOPING GOOD HABITS

I decided to pay more attention to my diet. No more 3AM suppers, less fried food,  and I opted for more vegetables and lean meat instead. The obvious choice was to cut down on sugary drinks which I had loved – each can of Coca-Cola contains 10.6 grams of sugar.I replaced soft drinks with low-calorie soft drinks, or juices, which are healthier alternatives.

My meals began to comprise more carbohydrates (rice) since I was beginning to exercise more and needed the glucose to perform, and more dietary fiber, such as vegetables and fruits. Not only does eating more vegetables and fruits help facilitate bowel movement, but it also gives the immune system a much-needed boost. I would try to have 2 servings of vegetables and 1 serving of fruits at every meal. Instead of deep-frying meat, I would choose to steam or broil it.

Besides all this, I tried not to eat past 10pm. Our body’s digestion process slows down as sleep time approaches. (Not) having supper played a big part in my weight control.

I started to have better quality sleep too because I learned that inadequate sleep upsets the balance of hunger hormones such as leptin and ghrelin. Sleep deficiency increases the production of ghrelin, which stimulates appetite.

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For Banjamin Quek, running is synonymous for overcoming the challenges in life. Photo credits: ONEATHLETE

CHOOSING TO RUN

I chose to lose weight through running, mainly because it allowed me immense freedom – rain or shine, fast or slow. Ironically, I used to hate running a lot because I never felt suited for it. My auntie would drag me along when she goes for a jog and I would find all sorts of excuses, just not the time.

It certainly took a lot of discipline to get started in running. In my sleeping shorts, white tee and my father’s oversized running shoes, I looked the part of a struggling runner barely able to complete 2.4km. However, as time went by, I was able to progress on to longer distances and with increasing ease. The key to running is consistency and to be willing to put in the hard work every day. The more you run, the better you get and it is really that simple.

Of course, it was (is) never easy to run every single day. In order to cope with the monotonous repetition in this endurance sport, setting the right mentality is important as well. Running is supposed to be enjoyable and I remind myself of this all the time. On days when I was tired, I would run at an easier pace or explore a new route. Setting milestones along the way also helped keep my motivation up. I was proud to check off the little boxes as I progressed from 2.4km to 10km, and beyond.

I would go on to represent Victoria Junior College and the National University of Singapore in competitive Cross-Country.

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Photo credits: ONEATHLETE

TRANSFORMED LIFE

Over the years, at different phases of my life, my purpose in running changed.

When I started, it was about keeping fit and losing weight. Coupled with the change in diet and lifestyle, I lost 10kg within a year and had become visibly more toned. It bolstered my self-esteem now that I was running further and faster than before. My 2.4km timing improved from 13 minutes in Secondary 1 to 8 minutes before I graduated from NUS.

In junior college, running helped to clear my mind when I was preparing for my ‘A’ level examinations. Since Victoria Junior College sits right next to East Coast Park, I would go for a run whenever I felt overwhelmed studying. The running break allowed me to focus better and be more productive when I hit the books again.

During my NS days, I used to stay in a 13-men bunk. It was hard to have time to myself but running around the camp gave me the opportunity for a few cherished, quiet moments.

Later, I joined the varsity team with the National University of Singapore. Running at a higher level of competition forced me to manage my time efficiently amidst a hectic academic schedule. It also taught me to persevere when the going gets tough and to have the discipline to stay the course to reach my goals. It was challenging to train during my undergraduate days. I would feel sore the morning after an evening workout, attend classes, train again in the evening and revise at night. I have had to turn down social gatherings and friends because I was simply too tired. Most of my peers stopped running after a year or two but I am glad that I didn’t, even though the temptation to do so was strong at times.

Besides this, running also taught me to keep going in the face of failure. There were moments when I thought I was on the verge of breaking down because of the overwhelming study load. However, every satisfying workout I have had on the track was a poignant reminder that I am more capable than I think I am. It gave me the courage and strength to deal with my doubts and insecurity.

In 2018, I decided to take a gap year to pursue my dream of running in Kenya and work towards realizing my long-held aspiration of becoming one of Singapore’s top distance runner. I hope that through my running journey, I will be able to inspire and motivate others to dare to dream and dare to chase after their dreams too.

Banjamin Quek is a mid-distance athlete with a 21.1km timing of 1:16:23. The NUS graduate is currently tutoring part-time to train full-time. The Under Armour Athlete will be competing in SCSM 2018. He is managed by ONEathlete.
Banjamin Quek is a mid-distance athlete with a 21.1km personal best timing of 1:16:23. The NUS graduate is currently tutoring part-time to train full-time. The Under Armour Athlete will be competing in SCSM 2018. He is managed by ONEathlete.

The Road Less Taken

NEW BALANCE SG – What truly makes running iconic is the road runners take to get there. The journey is never easy, physically and mentally, but every moment shapes the runner to who they are today. Discover the stories of athletes who broke through and found their own greatness. Scroll down for Mok Ying Ren’s road less taken! 

Scroll down to end of the page on details of social media giveaway. 


 

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Image by @newbalancesg

MOK YING REN
Double SEA Games Gold Medalist 
National Marathoner & Records Holder 
Managed by ONEathlete 

 

At one point in his running career, Mok Ying Ren suffered a plantar fasciitis injury. He was pushing too hard during his training, and as a result, he had to withdraw from the 2011 SEA Games. Some thought it’ll be “too difficult” for him to return to the sporting scene.

 

But the 30-year-old orthopedic surgical resident did not let that end his career.

 

 

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Image by @newbalancesg

He not only got back in the game but also clinched the gold medal for the marathon at the 2013 SEA Games. This hard-earned victory came with struggles too – he had entered the event with a muscle strain and a bad cough while on national service.

 

The two-time SEA Games gold medalist has since learned that there is more to winning than just getting the training in. Mok is currently balancing married life, training, family, and an orthopedics surgery programme that requires 80 hours of training a week, but this is not stopping the New Balance Ambassador & ONEathlete from aiming to qualify for the 2019 SEA Games.

 

“I realized that running a race presents similarities to our life journey and it’s always about running my own race, to the best that I can. Endurance running, in more ways than one, has inadvertently molded my character.”

 

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Click HERE to check out Mok’s NB 1500T2 Boa®. Image by @newbalancesg

 

 

Check out Mok Ying Ren’s #TheRoadLessTaken journey HERE.

 

Social Media Giveaway (12 Oct onwards):

  1. Share with us your favourite/significant running moments on facebook/instagram
  2. Tag 3 of your running mates on it 
  3. Hashtag us so we know! #RunWithMok #FearlesslyIndependent #NewBalanceSG #TheRoadLessTaken #RunONE #ONEathlete
  4. Get your running mates to share their stories too! (Refer to @newbalancesg Instagram highlights for giveaway details) 

 

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(c) New Balance SG http://www.newbalance.com.sg/theroadlesstaken.html 

ONEathlete Ben Moreau wins ONE at Straits Times Run 2018!

23 Sep 2018 – ONEathlete Ben Moreau took home the top honors in the Straits Times Run 2018 Men’s 18.45km category, winning in a time of 62 mins 46 secs, which was over 1 minute quicker than last year’s winner, Kenyan runner James Karanga. It was his maiden run in this race! (Top featured image by Straits Times Run Facebook)

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Article was published on Straits Times on 24 September HERE 

Ben, a previous Commonwealth Games representative, has steadily chalked up a series of race wins in the past few months, such as the Performance Series 10km as well as the inaugural ‘King of the Hills’ race, and demonstrated that he still has the legs to not let age (and his rivals) catch up with him.

 

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The trio ONEathlete who finished the race with no sweat!
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Evan (centre) sharing a post-race moment with fellow ONEathlete and national marathoner Ashley Liew (right), with RunONE co-founder Jed (left)

 

In the Men’s 10km category, ONEathlete Evan Chee finished as the fastest Singaporean and 4th overall with a time of 37 mins 7 secs. Evan, who is turning 38, is also showing no signs of slowing as he heads into peak race season in Singapore. He placed 3rd (Local Men’s) at Standard Chartered Singapore Marathon 2017 and is looking to better his results this year. He has also recently shared his thoughts on Masters running where he hoped to promote and encourage the idea of running as an inclusive sport for everyone, regardless of age, gender and athleticism. This was also echoed by Guest-of-Honour, Minister for Culture, Community and Youth Grace Fu, who praised the event for being inclusive, and said: “It is great to see people of different backgrounds coming together here today.”

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ONEathlete Ashley Liew who also ran his maiden ST Run, finished 7th overall, and 3rd local in the 10km category, was in high spirits post-race. Ashley’s last marathon was at the Gold Coast, and it seems like he will now have some tips for his counterpart who will be participating in the 2019 Edition, as part of his Champion prize! The prize was sponsored by Tourism Queensland for the Straits Times Run 2018!

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Minister MCCY Ms Grace Fu together with National Marathoner Mok Ying Ren (right), Ashley Liew (middle), Evan Chee (right) and RunONE Co-founder Jed Senthil (2nd fr right). Photo by Ming Ham

In returning to the Sports Hub after a 2-year hiatus when the race venue relocated to the  F1 Pit Building and Padang, the 6th edition of the race saw over 13,000 participants, most of whom were eyeing the uniquely memorable opportunity of being able to finish the race inside the 55,000-seat national stadium.

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The ONE Family at the Sports Stadium

Kelly Latimer and Ross had the uphill task of getting the moods up on the early Sunday morning! Despite the 5am flag-off, the mood at the start was lively and electrifying as participants got ready to enjoy the scenic route. Unlike in 2017 where the race started on the Esplanade Bridge, this year’s route was a nod to its original venue at the Sports Hub.

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The 10km runners at the start line! 

 

Read more about the STRun Festival & Mok Ying Ren’s Race Clinic HERE 

Read more about what you can do-post ST Run, on this week’s #AskMok HERE 

ST: You have done it!

This article was first published in The Straits Times on 25 Sep 2018, post-race of Straits Times Run 2018. 

MOK YING REN – Congratulations on completing your race! 

I hope you have all managed to achieve your goals! Now, it is time to treat your bodies to some well-deserved rest. 

Back in 2013, right after my SEA Games marathon race, I remember having to catch the first flight back to Singapore to return to my Medical Officer Cadet Course. Within a matter of days, I was back to carrying field packs and simulating casualty evacuation casualties with an incredibly sore body. It was definitely not an ideal recovery plan, but inevitable as I was still serving my national service then. 

Unlike what I had gone through, you need not, and should not, undertake physical stress so soon after a long and intense race.

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Mok Ying Ren running past the Sports Hub, where the Straits Times Run 2018 finishing point and festival village was held. He recommends that the participants take a break to recover and catch up on other commitments. Photo credits: ONEATHLETE

Recovery 

It is key to recover well from any bout of strenuous activity. 

I know that some of you may be feeling great now and you may even be tempted to think: what is there to recover from? Well, the bad news is that any soreness which you may experience will only come to bear, much later! (my guess is probably Tuesday)! 

If you recall the supercompensation theory which we had introduced earlier, you would be aware that your body is currently undergoing a major overhaul to bring you to the next fitness level. However, this can only happen with sufficient rest and recovery. 

Sleep plays a huge role in this process of supercompensation. It should not be a problem for you to sleep a little more now since you no longer have to wake up for early morning runs (for a while at least)! 

Once the soreness wears off, you may feel a natural urge to get back to running. Instead of falling into that temptation, do some other non-weight-bearing activities, such as swimming or cycling for another week (or two).  This will help to enhance your recovery and reduce the risk of injury. 

Even when returning to running, always err on the side of caution, and keep your initial runs to 20 to 30 minutes long at a conversational pace.

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Remember to stretch all the aches on your body! 

Work out niggles 

During the training season, you may also have suffered from various aches and pains which were simply ignored. Now is the best time for you to sort out all these issues and allow your body to heal. 

If necessary, you may also wish to visit a physical therapist and have a biomechanical assessment to identify specific areas of weakness. You may then work on these specific areas to prevent recurrence of pain or injury. From my experience, small deposits of therapy and pre-rehabilitation work on a regular basis can bring you huge gains, in terms of the number of your “running years”.

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Show appreciation

I am sure that you have spent countless hours training in preparation for your race. But I am also sure that it would not have been possible without the support of your loved ones – it is time to reciprocate their support for you. 

Too often, we take many things, like having a warm meal waiting for us at home after a long day of work and training, for granted. Show your appreciation to those who have cared for and supported you.

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Happy to take overall 7th (local 3rd) at my maiden @straits_times Run 10km yesterday. It was a great outing with fellow #ONEathlete @evanchee also placing well in the 10km and @ben_moreau on fire with his overall win in the 18.45km! 🔥 Thanks to the @onemanagementsg family including manager @jedsent (also ran the 10km) for the race opportunity and Dr @mokyingren for the support, as well as @runningtan for the write-up (see https://runone.co/2018/09/23/runone-wins-one-at-straits-times-run-2018/). Massive shoutouts to fiancée @sandrafaustinalee for now being able to keep up with me on my final 100m sprint, fellow #KampongRunners who just conquered respective marathons, sponsor @asicssg, and Dr Kelvin Ng of Family Health Chiropractic Clinic for actively checking and adjusting my spine to keep me performing optimally! Last but not least, it was an honour reconnecting with Minister @gracefu.hy, the last time being after the 2015 Southeast Asian Games Marathon when I was still a chiropractic intern at @shermancollege. Next up, starting the season towards the @sgmarathon! #STrun2018 #STrun #TheStraitsTimes #RunONE #TeamASICS #ASICSSG #IMoveMe #FamilyHealthChiroSG #SingaporeAthletics #OneTeamSG #MCCYSG #SGsportsHub #ShermanPride #SCSM2018 #OakleySG

A post shared by Ashley Dominic Liew, DC, CACCP (@ashleyliewchiro) on

Length of recovery

How long should you be engaged in the above recovery process? That really depends on each individual.

I would generally recommend a recovery period of between 1 to 2 weeks for a half marathon and between 2 to 4 weeks for a marathon. However, what is most essential is for you to listen to your body – do not be afraid to adjust your recovery plan according to how your body feels and responds.

As my then-deputy headmaster in Raffles Institution, Mr. S Magendrian had always emphasized, “there is a season for everything”. Now is the season for recovery.

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@mokyingren

Read more about the ST Run 2018 race event HERE 

Read more about the STRun Festival & Mok Ying Ren’s Race Clinic HERE 

Mok Ying Ren at the launch of Start Your Impossible, Toyota's initiative launch. Photo credits: ONEathlete

Start Your Impossible

13 September 2018 – In typical Japanese innovative fashion, the unveiling of Toyota’s first global corporate initiative #StartYourImpossible (SYI) towards its transformation from a car company to a mobility company, was simply jaw-locking! The initiative celebrates the Olympic and Paralympic spirit.

 

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Mok Ying Ren (extreme left) and other Team Toyota key opinion leaders, made up of national athletes and fitness enthusiasts. Photo credits: ONEathlete

Toyota also announced its region-wide partnership with 12 Olympic and Paralympic aspirants from Asia, including Singapore swimmers and golden water boys, Joseph Schooling and Toh Wei Soong.  Both will support the initiative by championing their hero projects. Various other national athletes (from the likes of, Double SEA Games Gold Medalist & #ONEathlete, Mok Ying Ren, and Olympian-Sprinter, 叶劲维 Timothee Yap) and fitness enthusiasts (from the likes of Race Driver Claire Jedrek, Ironman Triathlete Cheryl Tay, Rhythm cycling instructor Jia En, actress Ase Wang, etc) were also part of the larger ensemble.

 

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Mr Susumu Matsuda announcing the 12 Team Toyota Hero Athletes. Photo credits: ONEathlete

Other Olympic and Paralympic Heroes from the region, Marcus Fernaldi Gideon (Badminton, Indonesia), Ni Nengah Widiasih (Para Powerlifting, Indonesia), Anchaya Ketkeaw (Para Swimming, Thailand), Panipak Wongpattanakit (Taekwondo, Thailand) were also in attendance.

 

Inspired by Toyota’s worldwide partnership with the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), it also marks Toyota’s support of the creation of a more sustainable, inclusive and mobile society. Three different mobility devices were launched:

  • The Toyota Human Support Robot created to support the long-term for elderly care and health care, served the President of Toyota Motor Asia Pacific, Mr. Susumu Matuda, a bottle of water amidst his opening speech!
  • They displayed the Toyota Welcab (assistive vehicle) that has an electrically-powered ‘side lift-up tilt seat’ which rotates, tilts and comes down out of the vehicle.
  • Mok Ying Ren’s personal favorite was the Toyota i-Road. It is an exciting ultra-compact three-wheeled electric vehicle that combines the ease of motorcycle + the comfort/stability of a car. He also test-drove and commented on its excellent maneuverability.

 

The pompous launch event held in Infinite Studio Singapore was hosted by Toyota Motor Asia Pacific and its distributor Borneo Motors (Singapore). The event was emcee-ed by a very familiar and beautiful fair lady in the sporting scene, Kelly Latimer.

 


 

Catch up on Mok Ying Ren’s involvement in the #StartYourImpossible Campaign right here! Don’t forget to visit www.startyourimpossible.asia!

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Mok Ying Ren at the entrance of Start Your Impossible, Toyota’s initiative launch. Photo credits: ONEathlete

 

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I booked out of my medical officers’ course in army, and flew into Myanmar one day before the race. I was still trying to get over a dry cough and strain on my hip muscles. As a underdog, and given my conditions, it was near impossible for me to win the race. Even at the final stretch, i trailed behind in the 4th position. I ran into the stadium, as my family and Singaporeans roared to spur me on, closing the gaps to finish in 2:28:36. Later, It was my honor to hear the Singapore national anthem on the podium, for Singapore’s first SEA Games Marathon Male Gold Medal in 2013 #StartYourImpossible Read more via link in bio https://runone.co/startyourimpossible #RunWithMok #RunONE #ONEathlete www.startyourimpossible.asia 📸: SSC / ONE

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