ONEathlete finish strong at the final TPS race!

14 October 2018 – The Performance Series 2018, now in its 3rd year, crossed its finishing line this morning, with its 4th race of the year. It had earlier held its races at Punggol Waterway (Apr), Pasir Ris Park (Jun), and Bedok Reservoir (Aug) before this final installment of the year at East Coast Park.

 

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The race – tagged on social media as #TranscendYourself – went on as planned, despite the heavy downfall and chilly weather on the early mornings of the Sunday. About 2000 odd runners had gathered in anticipation at the beach area after they were notified of the 15mins postponement in view of the weather. The 10km was flagged off at 7.45am with 3 of the #ONEathlete gunning for their best in the drizzle.

 

Ben Moreau led the pack of open-category participants throughout the race. He completed the 10km race with a timing of 32:38. Eventually, he was also awarded the trophy for being the 10km Overall Winner! It was no surprise that the British-citizen was ready to go for more, given his stellar performance in the recent Straits Times Run 2018 too!

 

His fellow ONEathlete(s), Banjamin Quek (35:52) and Ashley Liew (37:48) finished 2nd and 3rd in the Local 10km category, close behind Prashanth Silva. Both talents are in the midst of gearing up their training for the upcoming Standard Chartered Singapore Marathon 2018, in December.

 

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Opting for a slightly shorter race in view of his tight race schedule in October, was Evan Chee. He finished 4th with an unofficial timing of 18:38.

 

The local race that is organized by Just Run Lah, boasts of some key industry and community partnership, in addition to having Garmin as their title sponsor for the 2018 series! The race has also made significant efforts to raise the profile of local athletes by having a separate category for the local competitive runners.

 

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ONEathlete congratulates Just Run Lah on this feat, as well as, to thank them for this opportunity to see all its athletes on the podium this morning!

ST: Shredding my weight to go the distance!

This article was first published in The Sunday Times on 14 October 2018

BANJAMIN QUEK – When I was a primary school student, life was good – sedentary, and revolving around gaming and 3am suppers. Looking back, I was 68kg, 170cm, and neither very proud nor concerned about how my appearance. I was also encouraged, and offered, to eat more during meal times because that was how a traditional Asian family showed care and concern.

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Banjamin Quek in his younger days. Photo credits: ONEATHLETE / BANJAMIN QUEK

The turning point came when I was 13 years old and had just entered Secondary 1. I was deemed unfit (figuratively and literally) for my CCA (NCC Land) and that was my first real setback as a result of how I looked. I was sidelined during team games because no one wanted a player who couldn’t pull their weight. Needless to say, I did not have much success with relationships because of my ‘chubby’ appearance.

As a result, I became really upset because I felt unfairly judged based on superficial qualities. That got me started to read up more on food and nutrition and I realized how consuming food high in fats presents higher risks to our health and mortality.

Thus started my decision and journey to lose weight and lead a healthier lifestyle so that I would be able to fit into social circles and feel less inferior about myself.

DEVELOPING GOOD HABITS

I decided to pay more attention to my diet. No more 3AM suppers, less fried food,  and I opted for more vegetables and lean meat instead. The obvious choice was to cut down on sugary drinks which I had loved – each can of Coca-Cola contains 10.6 grams of sugar.I replaced soft drinks with low-calorie soft drinks, or juices, which are healthier alternatives.

My meals began to comprise more carbohydrates (rice) since I was beginning to exercise more and needed the glucose to perform, and more dietary fiber, such as vegetables and fruits. Not only does eating more vegetables and fruits help facilitate bowel movement, but it also gives the immune system a much-needed boost. I would try to have 2 servings of vegetables and 1 serving of fruits at every meal. Instead of deep-frying meat, I would choose to steam or broil it.

Besides all this, I tried not to eat past 10pm. Our body’s digestion process slows down as sleep time approaches. (Not) having supper played a big part in my weight control.

I started to have better quality sleep too because I learned that inadequate sleep upsets the balance of hunger hormones such as leptin and ghrelin. Sleep deficiency increases the production of ghrelin, which stimulates appetite.

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For Banjamin Quek, running is synonymous for overcoming the challenges in life. Photo credits: ONEATHLETE

CHOOSING TO RUN

I chose to lose weight through running, mainly because it allowed me immense freedom – rain or shine, fast or slow. Ironically, I used to hate running a lot because I never felt suited for it. My auntie would drag me along when she goes for a jog and I would find all sorts of excuses, just not the time.

It certainly took a lot of discipline to get started in running. In my sleeping shorts, white tee and my father’s oversized running shoes, I looked the part of a struggling runner barely able to complete 2.4km. However, as time went by, I was able to progress on to longer distances and with increasing ease. The key to running is consistency and to be willing to put in the hard work every day. The more you run, the better you get and it is really that simple.

Of course, it was (is) never easy to run every single day. In order to cope with the monotonous repetition in this endurance sport, setting the right mentality is important as well. Running is supposed to be enjoyable and I remind myself of this all the time. On days when I was tired, I would run at an easier pace or explore a new route. Setting milestones along the way also helped keep my motivation up. I was proud to check off the little boxes as I progressed from 2.4km to 10km, and beyond.

I would go on to represent Victoria Junior College and the National University of Singapore in competitive Cross-Country.

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Photo credits: ONEATHLETE

TRANSFORMED LIFE

Over the years, at different phases of my life, my purpose in running changed.

When I started, it was about keeping fit and losing weight. Coupled with the change in diet and lifestyle, I lost 10kg within a year and had become visibly more toned. It bolstered my self-esteem now that I was running further and faster than before. My 2.4km timing improved from 13 minutes in Secondary 1 to 8 minutes before I graduated from NUS.

In junior college, running helped to clear my mind when I was preparing for my ‘A’ level examinations. Since Victoria Junior College sits right next to East Coast Park, I would go for a run whenever I felt overwhelmed studying. The running break allowed me to focus better and be more productive when I hit the books again.

During my NS days, I used to stay in a 13-men bunk. It was hard to have time to myself but running around the camp gave me the opportunity for a few cherished, quiet moments.

Later, I joined the varsity team with the National University of Singapore. Running at a higher level of competition forced me to manage my time efficiently amidst a hectic academic schedule. It also taught me to persevere when the going gets tough and to have the discipline to stay the course to reach my goals. It was challenging to train during my undergraduate days. I would feel sore the morning after an evening workout, attend classes, train again in the evening and revise at night. I have had to turn down social gatherings and friends because I was simply too tired. Most of my peers stopped running after a year or two but I am glad that I didn’t, even though the temptation to do so was strong at times.

Besides this, running also taught me to keep going in the face of failure. There were moments when I thought I was on the verge of breaking down because of the overwhelming study load. However, every satisfying workout I have had on the track was a poignant reminder that I am more capable than I think I am. It gave me the courage and strength to deal with my doubts and insecurity.

In 2018, I decided to take a gap year to pursue my dream of running in Kenya and work towards realizing my long-held aspiration of becoming one of Singapore’s top distance runner. I hope that through my running journey, I will be able to inspire and motivate others to dare to dream and dare to chase after their dreams too.

Banjamin Quek is a mid-distance athlete with a 21.1km timing of 1:16:23. The NUS graduate is currently tutoring part-time to train full-time. The Under Armour Athlete will be competing in SCSM 2018. He is managed by ONEathlete.
Banjamin Quek is a mid-distance athlete with a 21.1km personal best timing of 1:16:23. The NUS graduate is currently tutoring part-time to train full-time. The Under Armour Athlete will be competing in SCSM 2018. He is managed by ONEathlete.

ST: Remember The Poor

This article was first published in The Sunday Times on 30 September 2018

JED SENTHIL – Over the years, and especially in recent times, our society has evolved to become more sensitive towards the needs of the less privileged and more supportive of philanthropic causes. While MNCs and big corporates enthusiastically engage in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives, social enterprises have also sprung up, promoting sustainable charitable causes. Riding on this momentum, there has also been a significant effort within the local sporting community to mobilize active individuals and runners to commit to a larger good while keeping fit at the same time.

So before you put on your shoes and go for your next run, there are ways that you can help contribute too:

Support a worthy cause

To send our future generation to school and ensure that they are in the best physical, mental and emotional state to learn while at it. This is exactly what The Straits Times Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) endeavors to do – to give every child the gift of knowledge, and an opportunity for a promising future. SPMF works with various mainstream schools, VWOs, and NGOs to identify school-going children in need and provide them with the resources to do well in school, primarily by helping them meet basic physiological needs.

Since its inception 18 years ago, SPMF has disbursed more than $60 million and supported over 160,000 underprivileged children and youth by providing them with monthly school pocket money. As someone who came from a low-income family background, I can vividly recall filling up application forms for funding when SPMF had just been rolled out. I would use the funds to pay for my meals during recess, transport, and uniforms and books.

If you were one of the 13,000 runners who participated in The Straits Times Run 2018 last weekend, then you have also made an important contribution in supporting this worthy cause.

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Jed participated with his nephew and niece in The Straits Times Run last weekend, with an aim to inculcate the habit of giving back to social causes. Photo credits: RUNONE / MOK YING REN


Impact ‘one starfish at a time’

While serving in the social services sector, I met a  primary school boy who stayed in a one-room rental flat with his single mother and four siblings. His mum was working multiple odd jobs and was unable to commit to full-time regular employment as she had to take care of her children who were frequently ill. As a result, the boy was undernourished, slept poorly, and clearly lacked the energy a young boy should have. Later, we discovered that he had been bullied and mocked at school due to his family circumstances. He refused to attend school henceforth.  

While this boy’s situation may not necessarily be representative of all underprivileged children, he is certainly not the only one. Perhaps one might be tempted to think that youths are at a stage in life where multiple stress factors are part and parcel of their maturing and that we as adults are not able to make much difference to their situation. But nothing can be further from the truth. In the case of the schoolboy mentioned earlier, with a little support, he was able to overcome his odds courageously!

As the saying goes, you might not be able to save every starfish on the beach, but to each starfish saved, you make all the difference. You too can help contribute indirectly by participating in a community run like the Straits Times Run, or directly by rallying your running group to befriend/mentor the children and youths through the VWOs (as mentioned in the 29 July article). You will be pleasantly surprised by the resilience and courage these children embody, in pursuing a life of dignity and independence.

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As the saying goes, Jed believes that you can make a difference to one starfish at a time. Photo credits: RUNONE / MOK YING REN


Give (what you can) eagerly

While more than 10,000 children and youth benefit from the SPMF every year, I also learned from my interaction with social workers that current funding support is insufficient. Furthermore, in recent years, the SPMF has revised the criteria and expanded application touch points, to support more needy households and ensure that help is readily available, especially for those who might fall through the cracks. As a result, the need for support and funding is expected to increase.

While a majority of charity and social causes depend on the donations from big corporates and philanthropists, we as individuals can also give what we can. It could be a widow’s penny, but it’s truly the thought that counts. Do consider championing a cause you feel the tug for in your running club, or your company.

If you too have the opportunity to do good and are eager to remember the children and youth from low-income families, you can also donate through SPMF’s website (www.spmf.org.sg/how-to-donate). Don’t forget to encourage your running kakis to give too!

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Jed takes part in runs that champions social causes regularly. He believes that every runner can play a part in giving back to altruistic causes through running. Photo credits: RUNONE / MOK YING REN
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Jed Senthil is a former civil servant who serves professionally in the social and social enterprise sectors. The avid runner and youth advocate is also the co-founder of the RunONE running community.

RunONE – Straits Times Run 2018 Official Training Partner

22 Sep 2018 – Returning back with RunONE as the official training partner for the Straits Times Run 2018, ONEathlete Mok Ying Ren had tailored a 16-week-long series of a training program and running-related columns to prepare runners for this event. In partnership with Straits Times, Mok also hosted a #RunWithMok column which incorporated, for the first time, an interactive #AskMok segment that invites readers and runners to ask Mok any running-related question. To cap off the series of preparation leading up to the race, Mok also hosted a race clinic on 22 Sep at the Straits Times Run race expo where he took to the stage and shared his running and training experience.

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The Sunday Times 23 Sep 2018 

As many among the audience were racing the Straits Times Run the next day, Mok peppered his talk and Q&A session with behind-the-scenes insights on the preparation he himself had gone through before his races. He also addressed queries on race day execution and provided his personal perspectives and helpful tips on training, hydration, injury prevention. Questions on running shoe selection and foot striding styles seemed to be popular too.

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Mok Ying Ren using his New Balance shoe to explain on foot striding styles.

Through his sharing, Mok hopes to help more individuals overcome their fear and reluctance and encourage them to be a part of the growing running community in Singapore. He has observed, over the past few years, a healthy sign that more Singaporeans are taking to sports as part of an active lifestyle, and wants to do his part to help promote and encourage this movement.

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The talk by Mok Ying Ren was attended by more than 60 ST Run participants.
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Mok Ying Ren with some of the non-camera shy participants who attended his talk.

RunONE would like to take the opportunity, to thank #STRun2018 Chairman & Committee, New Balance, 100PLUS and Infinitus for their support in making the session possible!

 

Read more about the ST Run 2018 race event HERE 

Read more about what you can do-post ST Run, on this week’s #AskMok HERE 

 

ONEathlete Ben Moreau wins ONE at Straits Times Run 2018!

23 Sep 2018 – ONEathlete Ben Moreau took home the top honors in the Straits Times Run 2018 Men’s 18.45km category, winning in a time of 62 mins 46 secs, which was over 1 minute quicker than last year’s winner, Kenyan runner James Karanga. It was his maiden run in this race! (Top featured image by Straits Times Run Facebook)

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Article was published on Straits Times on 24 September HERE 

Ben, a previous Commonwealth Games representative, has steadily chalked up a series of race wins in the past few months, such as the Performance Series 10km as well as the inaugural ‘King of the Hills’ race, and demonstrated that he still has the legs to not let age (and his rivals) catch up with him.

 

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The trio ONEathlete who finished the race with no sweat!
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Evan (centre) sharing a post-race moment with fellow ONEathlete and national marathoner Ashley Liew (right), with RunONE co-founder Jed (left)

 

In the Men’s 10km category, ONEathlete Evan Chee finished as the fastest Singaporean and 4th overall with a time of 37 mins 7 secs. Evan, who is turning 38, is also showing no signs of slowing as he heads into peak race season in Singapore. He placed 3rd (Local Men’s) at Standard Chartered Singapore Marathon 2017 and is looking to better his results this year. He has also recently shared his thoughts on Masters running where he hoped to promote and encourage the idea of running as an inclusive sport for everyone, regardless of age, gender and athleticism. This was also echoed by Guest-of-Honour, Minister for Culture, Community and Youth Grace Fu, who praised the event for being inclusive, and said: “It is great to see people of different backgrounds coming together here today.”

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ONEathlete Ashley Liew who also ran his maiden ST Run, finished 7th overall, and 3rd local in the 10km category, was in high spirits post-race. Ashley’s last marathon was at the Gold Coast, and it seems like he will now have some tips for his counterpart who will be participating in the 2019 Edition, as part of his Champion prize! The prize was sponsored by Tourism Queensland for the Straits Times Run 2018!

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Minister MCCY Ms Grace Fu together with National Marathoner Mok Ying Ren (right), Ashley Liew (middle), Evan Chee (right) and RunONE Co-founder Jed Senthil (2nd fr right). Photo by Ming Ham

In returning to the Sports Hub after a 2-year hiatus when the race venue relocated to the  F1 Pit Building and Padang, the 6th edition of the race saw over 13,000 participants, most of whom were eyeing the uniquely memorable opportunity of being able to finish the race inside the 55,000-seat national stadium.

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The ONE Family at the Sports Stadium

Kelly Latimer and Ross had the uphill task of getting the moods up on the early Sunday morning! Despite the 5am flag-off, the mood at the start was lively and electrifying as participants got ready to enjoy the scenic route. Unlike in 2017 where the race started on the Esplanade Bridge, this year’s route was a nod to its original venue at the Sports Hub.

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The 10km runners at the start line! 

 

Read more about the STRun Festival & Mok Ying Ren’s Race Clinic HERE 

Read more about what you can do-post ST Run, on this week’s #AskMok HERE 

ST: You have done it!

This article was first published in The Straits Times on 25 Sep 2018, post-race of Straits Times Run 2018. 

MOK YING REN – Congratulations on completing your race! 

I hope you have all managed to achieve your goals! Now, it is time to treat your bodies to some well-deserved rest. 

Back in 2013, right after my SEA Games marathon race, I remember having to catch the first flight back to Singapore to return to my Medical Officer Cadet Course. Within a matter of days, I was back to carrying field packs and simulating casualty evacuation casualties with an incredibly sore body. It was definitely not an ideal recovery plan, but inevitable as I was still serving my national service then. 

Unlike what I had gone through, you need not, and should not, undertake physical stress so soon after a long and intense race.

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Mok Ying Ren running past the Sports Hub, where the Straits Times Run 2018 finishing point and festival village was held. He recommends that the participants take a break to recover and catch up on other commitments. Photo credits: ONEATHLETE

Recovery 

It is key to recover well from any bout of strenuous activity. 

I know that some of you may be feeling great now and you may even be tempted to think: what is there to recover from? Well, the bad news is that any soreness which you may experience will only come to bear, much later! (my guess is probably Tuesday)! 

If you recall the supercompensation theory which we had introduced earlier, you would be aware that your body is currently undergoing a major overhaul to bring you to the next fitness level. However, this can only happen with sufficient rest and recovery. 

Sleep plays a huge role in this process of supercompensation. It should not be a problem for you to sleep a little more now since you no longer have to wake up for early morning runs (for a while at least)! 

Once the soreness wears off, you may feel a natural urge to get back to running. Instead of falling into that temptation, do some other non-weight-bearing activities, such as swimming or cycling for another week (or two).  This will help to enhance your recovery and reduce the risk of injury. 

Even when returning to running, always err on the side of caution, and keep your initial runs to 20 to 30 minutes long at a conversational pace.

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Remember to stretch all the aches on your body! 

Work out niggles 

During the training season, you may also have suffered from various aches and pains which were simply ignored. Now is the best time for you to sort out all these issues and allow your body to heal. 

If necessary, you may also wish to visit a physical therapist and have a biomechanical assessment to identify specific areas of weakness. You may then work on these specific areas to prevent recurrence of pain or injury. From my experience, small deposits of therapy and pre-rehabilitation work on a regular basis can bring you huge gains, in terms of the number of your “running years”.

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Show appreciation

I am sure that you have spent countless hours training in preparation for your race. But I am also sure that it would not have been possible without the support of your loved ones – it is time to reciprocate their support for you. 

Too often, we take many things, like having a warm meal waiting for us at home after a long day of work and training, for granted. Show your appreciation to those who have cared for and supported you.

View this post on Instagram

Happy to take overall 7th (local 3rd) at my maiden @straits_times Run 10km yesterday. It was a great outing with fellow #ONEathlete @evanchee also placing well in the 10km and @ben_moreau on fire with his overall win in the 18.45km! 🔥 Thanks to the @onemanagementsg family including manager @jedsent (also ran the 10km) for the race opportunity and Dr @mokyingren for the support, as well as @runningtan for the write-up (see https://runone.co/2018/09/23/runone-wins-one-at-straits-times-run-2018/). Massive shoutouts to fiancée @sandrafaustinalee for now being able to keep up with me on my final 100m sprint, fellow #KampongRunners who just conquered respective marathons, sponsor @asicssg, and Dr Kelvin Ng of Family Health Chiropractic Clinic for actively checking and adjusting my spine to keep me performing optimally! Last but not least, it was an honour reconnecting with Minister @gracefu.hy, the last time being after the 2015 Southeast Asian Games Marathon when I was still a chiropractic intern at @shermancollege. Next up, starting the season towards the @sgmarathon! #STrun2018 #STrun #TheStraitsTimes #RunONE #TeamASICS #ASICSSG #IMoveMe #FamilyHealthChiroSG #SingaporeAthletics #OneTeamSG #MCCYSG #SGsportsHub #ShermanPride #SCSM2018 #OakleySG

A post shared by Ashley Liew, DC, CACCP (@ashleyliewchiro) on

Length of recovery

How long should you be engaged in the above recovery process? That really depends on each individual.

I would generally recommend a recovery period of between 1 to 2 weeks for a half marathon and between 2 to 4 weeks for a marathon. However, what is most essential is for you to listen to your body – do not be afraid to adjust your recovery plan according to how your body feels and responds.

As my then-deputy headmaster in Raffles Institution, Mr. S Magendrian had always emphasized, “there is a season for everything”. Now is the season for recovery.

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@mokyingren

Read more about the ST Run 2018 race event HERE 

Read more about the STRun Festival & Mok Ying Ren’s Race Clinic HERE 

Was it an Asian American dream? or just a Goliath’s David? – Osaka vs Williams

SHAHEED ALAM – I feel that Osaka’s win is huge for everyone in Japan (and even Asia in general.) The win serves as a massive inspiration to many girls in Japan to see that it is possible to make it big! Beyond that, it inspires tennis players in Asia (including myself) to realize that it is possible to challenge the top ranking European and American players.
Source: Instagram Naomi Osaka Tennis
Source: Instagram Naomi Osaka Tennis
One can comment much about Williams but we can’t deny that she is one of the best players ever to hold a racquet. I opine that she should’ve controlled her emotions better. After all, she is a top-class professional and she should be vast experienced enough to do that. However, I thoroughly understand where she’s coming from and the frustrations she must’ve felt.
The penalties controversy is a grey area. From the umpire’s point of view, he was just doing his job and saw that the coach is coaching her (now, the coach had also admitted to that, didn’t he?) However, the umpire should’ve have given Williams a verbal warning instead of a penalty. That would have served its purpose to stop the coach. No doubt it was a match on technicalities and not coaching, rules cannot be foregone.
On the other hand, ‘that escalated fast’ and I felt that Williams said things she should never say to an umpire, and in such a disrespectful way. She was also heard saying “I get this every year (that) I play here.” Indeed, she was ‘heavily involved’ and it was entirely her fault even in 2009 and 2011. She was also heard saying ‘Men do way worse and get away with it’. What a weak comparison, as I can assure you that many men have gotten a straight disqualification.
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Source: Instagram Serena Williams
The audience can’t really be blamed as they would not be able to hear the conversation between the umpire and Williams, and furthermore, the crowd was gathered to witness a historical moment. They wanted Serena Williams to win her 24th Grand Slam and tie Margaret Court as the All-time most number of singles titles.
In conclusion, I feel that Williams deserve all that she was severed (no puns intended) because it is a valuable lesson for the young ones around the world who are following the sport. If she had got away with such abusive comments to an umpire, that would have set some precedence to many other tennis players too. Also, in perspective, the $17,000 fine, however, is nothing compared to the $1.85million prize money she received.
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Source: Instagram Naomi Osaka Tennis

 

After much chaos, even with Williams arguing and all the controversies, nothing was taken away from Naomi Osaka – the newly minted champion who fully deserved the win. The champ outplayed Williams in all the categories. Realistically, Williams simply had no chance!
Even though it was a tad too late and the damage had been done; it was a moment to remember when Williams calmed the crowd down during the prize presentation to allow Osaka to enjoy her moment.

 

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Source: Instagram Naomi Osaka Tennis

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[#TranscendYourself with Garmin The Performance Series 2018 Finale Race 4 @ East Coast]
Promo code is valid till 15 September 2018 and registration are while stock lasts!
Register at https://www.theperformanceseries.sg/register/ with promo code RUNONE5OFF to get 5% off normal rate.
Date: 14 October 2018
Time: Morning
Categories: 10km, 5km
See you at @The Performance Series – Singapore Finale Race 4!

ONE @ AHM 2018

Running a race of any distance calls for a commitment that starts weeks, if not months before we reach the starting line. That in itself may sound daunting. But amongst the various sports and disciplines out there, running is actually the simplest! In the sense that it belies the challenge of performing at one’s best, and outperforming others, at a sport which puts one foot ahead of the other.

As we head into peak racing season in Singapore, which tends to start in the latter half of the year (usually August) with the SAFRA Bay Run and Army Half Marathon (SSBR & AHM), it is timely for those who are looking to maintain their fitness or improve upon their Personal Bests to look ahead and hit their strides.

Here’s how the ONE family went full swing into the AHM and race seasons, this quarter:

 

Training plan on NSMAN Magazine – Mok Ying Ren

Thank you SPH, NSMAN Magazine, SAFRA and AHM 2018 for the opportunity and feature as well! Photos and articles reproduced with permission from SPH.

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100PLUS Race Clinic – Mok Ying Ren 

IMG_9878Besides helping runners prepare for their upcoming races, the 100PLUS race clinic had also hoped to provide a lively platform for both seasoned and new runners to come together, get to know one another, and learn and grow as one running community. As Mok shared his experiences and tips on hydration and pacing strategies, and it was exciting to see a wide range of questions from diet and training to recovery and injury prevention. The vibrancy and life in today’s running scene are vastly different from a few yesteryears, and that is an encouraging sign!

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Race Pacing Strategies – Just as dress rehearsals are important for performing artists before the actual-day event, such shorter races would be beneficial in easing the nerves and allow runners to test out and be comfortable with their race pacing. This confidence-building measure could make or break the difference between a Personal Best and Worst, especially when the stakes are high on a major race like SSBR & AHM.

Hydration and Fuelling – When it comes to race hydration, too little is just as bad as too much. Reaching the right balance for your body will aid in optimal performance in a race. During a 2hour 30min marathon, Mok recommended taking in about 200ml of isotonic sports drinks every 20-30 minutes. Mok also shared that as a 100PLUS ambassador, his go-to drink would be the non-carbonated 100PLUS Active when he is training and running. This drink is formulated to help rehydrate and replenish electrolytes and minerals.

 

D-day @ SSBR-AHM 2018!

Amongst various athletes that joined their formation in this signature event for the armed forces, Banjamin Quek stood out with his 7th position with a timing of 1:18! It was his 5th year representing his division, and the camaraderie and team spirit that kept him going, despite feeling under the weather on race day. The full-time tutor, who trained 4-5 days a week has been handling an exceptionally challenging year with workload and health. Thus, he was even more delighted that 6th Div was in the 2nd place amongst the formation challenge!

What a lead up, it has been to the SSBR-AHM 2018!! A big thanks to the partners, SAFRA, SPH, 100PLUS, and all that contributed towards our participation in this local-focused run! and made all of the above possible!
Till the next race, and AHM 2019! Run ONE!

ST: Shaheed serves and sweeps ’em all!

04 Aug 2018 – At the recently concluded Singapore National Games – STA Open Pesta Sukan Tennis Championship 2018, ONEathlete and national tennis player, Shaheed Alam, secured a clean sweep across all 3 categories by winning the Men’s Singles (6-0, 6-3), Men’s Doubles (7-5, 6-4) and Mixed Doubles.

This was also covered on The Straits Times on 18 Aug 2018.

Shaheed bettered his results from the last STA Open Tennis C’ship in 2016, when he won the Men’s Singles and Mixed Doubles but lost in the Men’s Doubles finals to narrowly miss out on the hat-trick.

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2018 Singapore National Games Tennis at Kallang Tennis Centre on 2nd Aug 2018 6pm match on Court 3 between Shaheed Alam vs. Arbaquez Israel Jr. Shaheed Alam hits a forehand return. Photo by AndrewJKTan/ SportSG & ONEathlete

Earlier this year, Shaheed had won the Davis Cup Group 4 match with TeamSG Tennis and his victory at the Pesta Sukan C’ship shows again why Shaheed is a note-worthy rising star on our local tennis scene. Driven by the same motivation to do his family proud, Shaheed commits himself to put in his best during every training, rain or shine. That mentality proved to be the difference when he had to play 3 Finals matches back-to-back in a 5-hour ‘marathon’ which included a tie-breaker in the first set of the Men’s Doubles.

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Celebrating a clutch winner to win the tie-breaker set 7-5 in the Men’s Doubles. Photo by Manoj Banavali/ Sport SG & ONEathlete

Shaheed has certainly proved that he has the heart and lungs to go the distance when he took victory over Israel Arbarquez from Philippines in the Men’s Singles quarterfinals match which lasted over 3-and-half hours.

The hat-trick of wins ultimately took a lot of fitness and mental strength, but it also gave Shaheed the confidence knowing that he is able to hang in there and compete among the best even when the going gets tough. The SNG Pesta Sukan Tennis Championships invites experienced players with professional backgrounds and credentials and is pegged differently from the STA tournament which caters more to the junior level players. Tennis was included as part of the Singapore National Games for the first time in 2016.

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2018 Singapore National Games Tennis at Kallang Tennis Centre on 2nd Aug 2018 6pm match on Court 3 between Shaheed Alam vs. Arbaquez Israel Jr. Shaheed Alam’s Service motion. Photo by AndrewJKTan/SportSG & ONEathlete

While pleased with his performance, having seen that the results of his training paid off, Shaheed knows the honor is not his alone to claim. He is extremely grateful for his teammates, Rohan Kamdar (Men’s Doubles) and Evelina Kontareva (Mixed Doubles), whose support and encouragement carried him mentally and physically through the rough patches in this tournament. “Their support is also crucial as I play these back-to-back categories,” he recalls with humility.

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Shaheed sharing a proud moment on stage with his Mixed Doubles partner, Evelina Kontareva. Photo by Manoj Banavali / SportSG & ONEathlete

He will also like to thank his equipment sponsors, Head and Pro’s Pro, as well as Futuro for their invaluable support,  both on, and off, the court. Much credit is also due to the team of officials and medics, as well as Team Nila supporters and, last but not least, his family and friends, who have been his motivation, advice, and support ever since he embarked on his tennis career.

Asked about his plans and intentions, Shaheed has one eye firmly fixed on the 2019 SEA Games where he hopes to qualify and be a medal contender. For now, he will be starting on his polytechnic industrial internship as he continues working towards bigger dreams in his budding tennis career.

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Shaheed’s bedrock of strength and his pillar(s) of support. Photo by Manoj Banavali / SportSG & ONEathlete

Performance Continues at Bedok TPS 3

5 August 2018 – ONE continues its run of performance as the 2018 race season heads into full steam ahead, with 3 athletes amongst the top 4 Men-Closed 10km category at The Performance Series Race 3, Bedok Reservoir. Banjamin Quek came in 2nd (37:23) while  Evan Chee (38:54) finished in 3rd followed by fourth-placed Ashley Liew (39:19).

 

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Banja, Evan and Prashanth sharing the podium moment together 

The 2-lap race format comprised a mix of terrain – pavement and packed gravel surrounding the scenic Bedok reservoir. It provided runners a refreshing change from the usual tarmac-road race featured in earlier TPS races (Pasir Ris Park and Punggol Waterway). While the weather was relatively cool on this Sunday morning in the midst of an unusually hot mid-year, participants had to contend with a big uphill as part of the race route which added to the uniqueness of this morning’s performance challenge.

 

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For the Under Armour Ambassador, Banjamin Quek, finishing 2nd today was the comeback he had desperately sought, and needed, after a disappointing DNF at the Race Against Cancer 2 weeks ago. Heading into this 10km race, he learnt from the earlier episode and adjusted his pre-race preparation by managing his training and work carefully. While his results today represent a promising step forward in the right direction, Banjamin knows that there is still some more work to be done as he looks ahead towards the Army Half Marathon in 3 weeks’ time.

 

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Looking back at the close finish he had at RAC, Evan was also quietly pleased with his performance as he had taken the effort to work on his weaker areas by sharpening his speed-work over the past 2 weeks. Along with fellow training partner, Ashley Liew who finished in 4th today, today’s race is part of their final tune-up as they will both be running at the Army Half Marathon.

 

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ONE will also be participating in the upcoming fourth and finale TPS race which will be held on 14 October at East Coast Park. Runners can look forward to a blistering fast finish at one of Singapore’s iconic running backyard and its flat-as-pancake route, as we sign off on this exciting (Performance) series. Sign up now and enjoy an additional 5% discount with the promo-code “RUNONE5OFF“. Registration closes 31 August 2018, sign up now on https://www.theperformanceseries.sg/register

 

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ONE and friends at the race village post-run