20 Personalities You Might Have Run Into At Gold Coast Marathon 2019!

07 JUL 2019 – 26,287 Runners, from 56 countries had gathered at Queensland, Australia’s coastal city for the 41st edition of the Gold Coast Marathon 2019! Having held the IAAF Gold Label since 2014, boasting of a generally flat course that has allowed about 60% of the participants to set a personal best (PB) amidst generally favourable weather conditions, the Gold Coast Marathon (#GCM19) is arguably one of the most popular race spots in the region.

Which goes to also mean that if you are in town, enjoying the waves at Surfer’s Paradise or feasting at Cavil Mall, you might just #run into a couple of runners whom you might be familiar with.

RunONE takes a moment with 20 such personalities who have inspired us during the race weekend!

1. Lachlan barber (@lachiebarber)

(c) Gold Coast Marathon 2019 Media Team

In an enthralling men’s race, 800m and 1500m track specialist Lachlan Barber (00:29:58) put in a withering finish burst to claim his first Southern Cross University 10km Run (Men’s). He edged over Tim Vincent in the last 400m and won by five seconds. “I was very happy with my performance. I’ve never raced anything over 1500m, so yes, I was really stoked to get under 30 minutes in my first ever 10km,” said Barber.

Barber added that the conditions ‘weren’t ideal at the start line.’ He was referring to the very strong winds (and about 4-5km/h of headwind) and icy-cold rain shower that left everyone drenched when the skies open up just 2 minutes before the start of the 10km race at 6.30am.

2. leanne pompeani (@leannepomp)

(c) Gold Coast Marathon 2019 Media Team

Leanne Pompeani (00:33:00) won her second Southern Cross University 10km Run (Women’s), becoming only the second woman to win the race more than once in the event’s history. She had also represented Australia at the World Cross Country Championships in March and followed that up with a win in Canberra over 10km in April.

Looking back on the wet and cold conditions at the start, Leanne said, “A little bit unfortunate about the wind. It’s usually pretty good conditions here so I was kind of expecting that, but you just have to deal with whatever you get on race day.”

3. Yuki kawauchi (@yukikawauchiok)

One of Asia’s most famous and humble ‘citizen runner’, Japanese Yuki Kawauchi, had achieved 2:09:18 (2017) and 2:09:01 (2016), being the only athlete to have his name twice in the Top 10 All Time Performances honors.

He finished the race in 13th place at 02:15:32.

4. zane robertson (@zane_robertson_nzl)

Be careful that it’s Zane and not his twin brother Jake when you approach him! The 30-year old New Zealander brothers had moved to Iten, Kenya to train and further their running careers. ONEathlete Ashley was acquainted with Zane in Kenya during the former’s training stint in 2015.

Zane was actually selected to represent New Zealand in the Commonwealth Games Marathon Male event, but had to drop out due to a groin injury. About 15 months later, he is back in the game at #GCM19 !

The marathon debutant placed third in 2:08:19. He was very consistent throughout the race, staying in distance with the lead pack. He gives us a very detailed breakdown, “I was pretty conservative at the start. We knew the wind would be tough and it was but I kept the pacemakers in check by making sure the pace did not exceed 3:03min/km at the beginning.”

It was also an extra special moment for Zane as he had also set a new New Zealand record, bettering the previous mark set by his brother – Jake’s 02:08:26 set at Lake Biwa in 2018. It was no wonder then, that Zane seemed to be in high spirits at the finishing line – perhaps even ready for another run – as he was seen obliging quite a number of media interviews, including RunONE.

What’s even better was the sportsmanship he demonstrated, describing his race rivalry with great class and giving Shitara credit where due. “I think Yuta, the Japanese (runner), a world class athlete who played the game and played it smart. He expected to win and came through just when we were beginning to die. We had nothing left to go with him.”

5. Bernard lagat (@lagat1500)

Lagat, a Kenyan-American, is a five-time Olympian, having competed in the 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012 and 2016 games. He is also a thirteen-time medalist in World Championships and Olympics including five gold medals.

The Dual world champion over 1500m and 5000m on the track improved his marathon pb to 2:12:10 and finished seventh. The cool dude was seen focusing on recovery and getting a cold compression (as above), and enjoying a little muffin on one hand (while probably catching up on race updates on the other.)!

Do also check out his Instagram to spot his ‘deeply invested and impressive’ drink bottles for the #GCM19!

6. sinead diver (@Diversinead)

(c) Gold Coast Marathon 2019 Media Team

The first runner-up in 2018, Sinead Diver (01:09:46), beat 2-time champion, Sara Hall (01:1159) in the ASICS Women’s half-marathon race. This was also her first win, and fifth fastest performance in the race’s history. The 42-year-old from South Yarra, Melbourne was too strong for her rivals over the closing 5km. The Australians also had a clean podium sweep by claiming all top three positions in this race!

What was also envious to watch, was the level of sportsmanship that the champ exhibited. She said, “To race against Ellie and Sara and Lisa, it was such a tough race and anyone of us could’ve taken it out. It (just happened to be) my day today, so I was just lucky I think.” She has also qualified to represent Australia in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics Marathon event.

7. jack rayner (@jackrayner7)

The Glen Iris, Melbourne native, Jack Rayner won his second ASICS Gold Coast Half-marathon race (Men’s). The 23-year-old with a personal best of 01:01:01 set in Oct 2018 at Cardiff, crossed the line in 1:02:30, bettering his winning time from last year (1:03:12).

The defending champion came away with the win after a good tussle with Japanese runners Yuki Sato (01:02:36, six seconds outside his personal best set in May 2019) and Yuma Hattori (01:02:39), making his winning break 1km before the finish. Japanese runners filled places second through to eighth in the men’s race.

Rayner was asked about his competitors, and he replied in the vein of good old sportsmanship. “I didn’t quite know what to expect going into it. There was a really strong field of Japanese this year. I had a race there (Japan) at the start of this year so I knew how they ran.”

Rayner will be meeting the Japanese again very soon, as he has also qualified to represent Australia in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics Marathon event.

8. yuta shitara (@yutashitara1218)

(c) Gold Coast Marathon 2019 Media Team

Yuta Shitara. He is THE second fastest Japanese marathon runner in Japanese history. But now, with the win at the the IAAF Gold Label race in 2:07:50, Yuta has also laid claim to being the fastest runner in Gold Coast Marathon history! The previous record was set by Kenyan Kenneth Mungara (2:08:42) who won the race in 2018.

It was the eighth win by Japanese men in the event’s 41-year history. Yuta added “My training was really good. I think that the race really showed the quality of my training. It really brought out my performance today,” spoken by someone who clearly believes in the process!

This feat was despite a very visibly bloodied white vest, from what looks like a terrible case of chest fissures/abrasions. But without a single look of pain on his face and fully focused on the race ahead of him! “I didn’t have any race plan. I just wanted to go in and run the race that happened,” he says.

ONEathlete Giebert, in a once-in-a-lifetime moment with his idol, Yuta, So star-struck that he closed his eyes.

The 27-year-old champion who mostly carries a neutral expression, had an exciting duel with Kenyan, Barnabus Kiptum and New Zealander, Zane Robertson over the final 12km before making his final move in the last 2km. Shitara took home $20,000 in victory prize money and an additional $10,000 time bonus for his record-breaking effort.

9. shin kimura (@kimurunner)

With the likeliness of a K-pop star, a friendly and wide smile greets you from across the room, even though you are at least four meters apart. It turns out to be Shin Kimura, a rising marathon star from Honda Running Club in Tokyo, Japan.

He had spent a training stint in Boulder, Colorado to prepare for this marathon. Nike athletes, Shin Kimura and Bernard Lagat, took turns to pace each other and the former finished just 2 secs behind the latter at 02:12:12. Keep your eyes peeled for this star’s growth!

10. Milly clark (@millyjane14)

(c) Gold Coast Marathon 2019 Media Team

While Kenyan Rodah Jepkorir held off a strong finish from Milly Clark to win the Women’s Gold Coast Marathon Title, it was the latter who was received by the home crowd with a great loud roar! The Tasmanian sweetheart lost the lead at the 30km mark, but kept her rhythm and finished in 2:28:08 to claim the runner-up spot.

Despite being about two minutes and five seconds behind the Kenyan at the 30km mark, she finished just 12 secs behind the winner. She was clearly giving it all to catch up and edge in to try win the race!

The crowd probably helped too, she said as she reflected. “I had a lot of fun. There wasn’t a moment that I wasn’t loving it. I am just really stoked that I had the crowd and everyone around me cheering. You put in all the hard work in training and this is your prize. Instead of running alone and slugging it out on the roads, you can use the crowd. It gives you that extra burst.”

Clark had set off to do all that she wanted. She enjoyed the race. She recorded a personal best, lower than the Tokyo Olympics qualifier (2:29:30). She finished on the podium. The veteran at Gold Coast Marathon weekend, had won the Half-marathon in 2014, and second for 10km in 2013.

11. AGUS PRAYOGO (@agusprayogo21)

20th overall and South East Asia’s fastest in the Half-marathon Category, Agus Prayogo (01:06:27) broke Indonesia’s National Record to rewrite his own half marathon national record of 1:07:05, which he set at the Singapore Marathon in 2009.

The father and military personnel may seem like a young teenage man. But probably has collected more accolades than his age count. Enuf said, wait up for the SEA Games 2019 to see him shine!

The smile of a new Indonesian Half marathon National Record

12. Muhaizar Mohamad (@muhaizarmohamad)

Meanwhile, in the full marathon, Malaysian, Muhaizar Mohamad, finished in 35th place after recording 02:26:42. However, it was 15 secs slower than his personal best, 02:26:27 set at the 45th Berlin Marathon.

Muhaizar had became the first Malaysian to win a SEA Games medal in the marathon, after bagging a bronze in the 2017 Kuala Lumpur edition. His team mate Leo, finished fourth in the same race. The athlete in his early 30s, is now focusing on the SEA Games 2019 in Manila.

13. PRABUDASS KRISHNAN (@prabudassk)

29th overall and South East Asia’s second fastest in the Half-marathon Category – beating Singapore’s Half-marathon National Record Holder, Soh Rui Yong – was a 29 year old, young lad named Prabudass Krishnan, finishing at 01:07:29.

The feat saw the Royal Malaysian Navy member erase the 15-year-old Malaysian National Record. He has been training under Coach JP, who had also helped Malaysian National Marathoner Leo set a new Marathon National Record, earlier this year.

(c) Malaysian Photographer @fizsaid

Despite such a remarkable achievement, Prabu greets you a with a very unassuming and humble smile in the elite athletes room. Prabu is gunning to win the 5,000m Gold Medal at the SEA Games 2019. He had previously won the Silver Medal in 2017.

14. burton he (@burtonhe)

Burton He had won the Singapore Marathon 2018’s Half-marathon category in 01:20:11. But no fanfare, nothing pompous. The 29 year old, IT student in SIM University has become a regular at the podiums.

The relatively low profile athlete, was in Gold Coast with his Track Star Athletics team mates, ran his race, and left. He would have ‘escaped your eyes’ if you had blinked. He ran overall 53rd and emerged as the fastest Singaporean in the 10km Category.

Burton He (most extreme left) with his team members from Track Star Athletics. (c) Moonlake Lee.

15. melvin wong (@melvinwongyh)

Another Track Star Athletics athlete making his mark as the fastest Singaporean at the Gold Coast Marathon was Melvin Wong.

Melvin paced the race with his team mate Iskandar Mohamed and finished overall 69th in 02:37:28. The father of two, manages work, fatherhood and runs his life in great style! His team mate, Iskandar (who was also the runner-up at Singapore Marathon 2019) finished 92nd overall, at 02:42:36. Great camaraderie and working together as ONE to achieve goals are always worth mentioning!

16. shohib marican (@shibbylax)

We spotted him and congratulated on his overall 72nd position and emerging as the second fastest Singaporean in the Half-marathon category! Shohib Marican (01:13:14) was pleasantly surprised of course.

The ActiveSG athlete who is coached by Steven Quek, was initially filled with doubts and anxiety about his race. With a renewed mindset, he willed to go hard, focused on the pack ahead and finished with a personal best timing, no less. Go hard or go home, indeed!

Its always encouraging for those in the running circuit to see young athletes push the barriers, and achieve greater excellence!

17. ansgar cheng (@runningprof_dentist)

Speaking of young, the Master’s runner, Ansgar Cheng is more than just young at heart. He emerged 2nd overall in the marathon category, for Master’s Male with a personal best timing of 02:54:16.

The father of two teenage daughters, and dentist in his early 50s, is also awaiting ratification by Singapore Athletics for a new national record of his age group.

Among one of the core members of the Kampong Runners, Ansgar and his wife Moonlake Lee are an affable couple who makes the effort to connect with individuals from the various running groups. That in a sense, kinda depicts the essence of sports and affirms the spirit of the running community!

Ansgar (second from right, in white) seen at the finishing line with runners (L-R) from Hong Kong (David and Jeremy) and ONEathlete (Ashley and Giebert).

18. GIEBERT FOO (@gieberty)

The newly minted ONEathlete, Giebert Foo ran his first overseas marathon. He emerged 104th overall with a personal best of 02:44:15, 45 secs below his personal best that he had set after winning 3rd at Singapore Marathon 2018.

The civil servant had just completed his 9-month long stay-in training course recently. With the help of his partner, Esther (who was on wheels), Giebert paced his long runs and chased his training mileage over the weekends. On weekdays, he would also try to squeeze in some track tempo and intervals in the evening. Besides sticking to the discipline and controlling his diet, the 27 year old also read motivational quotes from Facebook page “Sweat Elite” to prepare for the race.

But during the race itself, Giebert remembered the prayers and encouragement of loved ones, absorbed the energy of the renowned Gold Coast crowd, and “High-fived” the kids along the way keep up the energy to the finish line. Crossing the line below his target, he said, “It is like a dream come true and has made me realise that i can go further in this marathon journey. I’m thankful for the support of the ONEathlete team which had made this PB a wonderful ONE!”

19. ashley liew

Running his 6th Gold Coast Marathon, and 33rd marathon since 2004, was ONEathlete Ashley Liew.

(c) Tsukasa Kawarai

The 32 year old – with a personal best of 02:32:12 (2015) – believed in the process and prepared like it was his first. Along the way, Ashley had to balance six-day work week at Family Health Chiropractic Clinic while training twice daily. His peak weekly mileage of 160km, not to mention solo 30+km long runs and treadmill speed workouts, amidst intensive wedding preparation, proves that Ashley was determined to make it work.

Spotted with bloodied socks from a burst blister, Ashley said “I’m grateful to still have the body responding well towards the end which was a positive difference from my last 3 marathons.” Finishing overall 175th in 02:51:42, Ashley was pleased to achieve his season best.

20. bonza, the mascot

He ain’t a frog tho he spots a green sleek body! Bonza is a bearded dragon, the mascot for the Gold Coast Marathon. He charmingly convinces that he loves to run, just like all his other bearded dragon friends. As a young lad, Bonza had run at Burleigh Head National Park,

Typically during a morning training run at Miami Beach, he tells us, “I was inspired by thousands from all over the world running up and down my beautiful coastline and thought ‘you little rippers!”.

Instead of hibernating in cooler months like July, Bonza decided that he wanted to be part of the good times, and for this one-of-a-kind race. He was determined to become the first bearded dragon to run at the Gold Coast Marathon, and took a break from chilling with his surfing buddies at Surfers’ Paradise to start training. “I’ve been clocking up plenty of kilo meters on the beautiful beachfront in perfect conditions along the marathon route.”

The 41 year old, is stoked that the race date for 2020 is scheduled to be on 4-5 July, and has already set his goals for the 42nd Gold Coast Marathon race! In good old gold coast fashion, he waves and high-fives to say, “See ya nex july mate!”

Ashley Liew, ONEathlete

Media Response – Jun 2019

18 JUN 2019 – In October 2018, Soh Rui Yong alleged that Ashley Liew did not slow down during the 2015 SEA Games marathon race.

RECAPITULATE
SNOC has independently investigated and collated four statutory declarations, which Soh had not made any efforts to view, despite the option to do so. Soh has continued with his allegations , and  challenged Ashley to raise the issue before the courts.
– We responded on 21 Oct 2018 to media queries. In spite of this, Soh continued to maintain his allegations insinuating that Ashley had lied.
– Following SNOC’s ‘retract and withdraw’ letter to Soh, and Soh’s non-compliance, we responded on 02 Apr 2019 to media queries. We mentioned that we were examining all legal options available to ONEathlete, Ashley Liew in view of these developments.
– On 09 Apr 2019 to media queries, ONEathlete pointed out that Soh had ignored facts, material evidence and witnesses, but chose to make a fundamental and ‘safe’ shift in position.


SOH CONTINUES HIS ALLEGATIONS

Soh was given various opportunities to retract his repeated allegations and apologise. Even with a legal notice served by various parties, he still had several opportunities from October 2018 to June 2019. He has chosen not to retract his allegations, and in fact, had escalated his allegations on Ashley.


ASHLEY’S STATEMENT POST-COMMENCEMENT OF LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

There is nothing ideal about an athlete suing another. Ashley’s predisposition is to avoid conflict and controversy, but where it comes to allegations against his honour and integrity, he has no choice but to make a firm stand:

On 8 April 2019 I said to the press that “I cannot remain silent anymore”.

Since then, I had attempted to negotiate an amicable settlement with Soh with the assistance of my lawyer, Mr Mark Teng of That.Legal LLC. I am advised that I may not disclose the details of our without prejudice negotiations. However, I wish to say that it is regretful that Soh has adamantly maintained his position and refused to apologise and retract his defamatory statements.

Soh’s unwillingness to retract his statements is obvious from the series of social media posts that Soh had caused to be published about me and this incident. Some examples of what Soh posted on social media after my first cease and desist letter are as follows:
On 9 April 2019, Soh declared on his social media channels that he will “now battle [me] for the truth of the 2015 SEA Games Marathon”;
On 12 April 2019, Soh posted on his social media channels after receiving That.Legal LLC’s letter that he was “amount  to reply with a 1-page legal letter to say no” even before his lawyers had a chance to send their formal response;
On 10 May 2019, after receiving my lawyer’s letter Soh posted again on his social media channels that he would be responding to “say no” again before his lawyers had a chance to send their formal response;
On 26 May 2019, Soh made posts on his social media channels calling me an idiot who took the chance to make up a hero story in his post titled “42 Reasons why I HATE Running Marathons #21 to #30” [See page 20 of the SOC]:
When #23 happens you might have idiots who take the chance to make up a hero story about slowing down to wait for others as an excuse for that’s why they didn’t win, then send you lawyer’s letters when you call their bullshit and embarrass them publicly

I wake up every morning striving to be the best that I can be. I hold the values of honesty and integrity in high regard. Soh’s actions on social media have caused Singaporeans to question my integrity and that crosses the line. Soh’s false statements and aggravating comments have not only hurt my feelings but also disparaged my reputation.

In light of the foregoing, I feel that I have no choice but to ask the Court to vindicate my reputation.

– Ashley Liew, National Marathoner (ONEathlete)


FURTHER ACTION

ONEathlete supports Ashley Liew for the truth he deserves and legal options that were offered to him. The Statement of Claim (SOC) and a summary for the SOC will be made available to the members of the press, upon request.

ONEathlete also understands that SNOC has reserved all legal rights against Soh, unlike what the latter had claimed on his social media platforms.

Regards,
ONEathlete Team

Ashley Liew, ONEathlete

Media Response II – Apr 2019

09 Apr 2019 – In October 2018, Soh Rui Yong alleged that Ashley Liew did not slow down during the 2015 SEA Games marathon race.

SUMMARY OF EVENTS:

IGNORING THE FACTS

Soh had accused ONEathlete of ‘using personal attacks rather than sticking to facts’ on a Today Sports social media post on 02 April 2019. Despite the availability of sworn statements from witnesses in the form of the Statutory Declarations that were available for Soh’s review upon request, he has decided to ignore them and maintain his allegations against Ashley.

  • In 2015, Soh had won the 2015 SEA Games Marathon Gold. Ashley hung on to finish 8th.
  • In Oct 2018, Soh called himself a champion of the ‘truth’ by calling Ashley a liar. On 26 Oct 2018, Soh reiterated that Ashley was “conjuring, exaggerating, and circulating a fictional tale of sportsmanship … ”, Ashley chose to de-escalate.
  • In Apr 2019, Soh ignored witnesses’ sworn-in statements that contradicted his ‘truth’, and called Ashley a liar, again.
  • In Apr 2019, Soh refused to retract his allegations. He brands himself as the ‘rebel’ who won’t be intimidated and will see this as an opportunity to stick it out and make his point.

All this while, Ashley was faced with questions and doubted by many for doing the right thing during the race.  

MATERIAL EVIDENCE & WITNESSES

In response to suggestions that we provide GPS watch data from the race, unfortunately, Ashley was using a Timex analog (non-GPS watch) during the 2015 SEA Games Marathon, and up till Jan 2018.

ONEathlete understands that as of Oct 2018, no video evidence of the 2015 SEA Games Marathon race was available. The event was also not broadcasted. The existence of the statutory declarations containing the accounts of eyewitnesses as to what had transpired during the race is therefore of material significance, since these accounts not only form the best available evidence, but there would be no reason to doubt the credibility and accuracy of these independent, third party accounts given that it is an offence to make a false statement under the Oath and Declarations Act (Cap. 211).

Excerpt from 02 Apr 2019: Unlike those whom Soh claims to be his witnesses (such as Philippines athlete, Rafael Roliquit Jr, who had received coaching advice from Soh, as well as, two other individuals who were Soh’s coaches), we understand that these four individuals are independent witnesses who were prepared to and did, in fact, make sworn statements of what they saw during the race.That is the material difference – anyone can say anything you want on social media and get away with untruths and lies, but not so when you make statutory declarations.

We disagree with Soh’s suggestion that the witnesses’ statutory declaration lacks credibility. The 4 witnesses’ identities have not been publicly revealed, but they are far from nameless individuals. Soh does not even appear to be interested in who they are of what they have said since he has so far ignored SNOC’s offer to view the statutory declarations.

SHIFT IN POSITION

Soh had shifted his stance between Oct 2018 and April 2019. In Oct 2018, Soh definitively alleged that ‘Ashley did not slow down’. But in Apr 2019, he downplayed his allegations and claimed he ‘did not see Ashley slowing down’. The shift, while subtle, is significant and non-accidental. We believe that as a learned individual, Soh is aware of the difference implied in these two statements.  

EXERCISING LEGAL OPTIONS

“From a personal standpoint, I have not responded publicly to something like this because it is not my nature to fan any controversy. To me, staying silent on the matter was an exercise in de-escalation, not an admission of guilt.
However, with the insinuations continuing, I cannot remain silent anymore. I believe it is time to speak up and clear the air.”
– Ashley Liew, National Marathoner (ONEathlete)

Through his lawyer, Mark Teng of That.Legal LLC, Ashley Liew has sent a cease and desist letter requesting, amongst other things, that Soh retracts his statements and make a public apology.

It has been a challenging period and the decision, a tough one, for Ashley. However, no one should take his kindness for weakness. ONEathlete supports Ashley’s decision to seek the justice he deserves.

We hope that Soh will co-operate with SNOC’s and Ashley’s lawyers, to resolve this matter as amicably as possible and put this unnecessary matter to rest.

Regards,
ONEathlete Team

Ashley Liew, ONEathlete

Media Response – Apr 2019

02 Apr 2019 – In October 2018, Soh Rui Yong alleged that Ashley Liew did not slow down during the 2015 SEA Games marathon race. We responded on 21 Oct 2018 to media queries. In spite of this, Soh continued to maintain his allegations insinuating that Ashley had lied.

Soh’s allegations

Soh’s allegations had unfairly cast doubt over ONEathlete, Ashley Liew’s repute as an individual, working professional and national athlete, as well as, the merit and integrity of nominating Ashley for and eventual award of the Pierre de Coubertin World Fair Play Trophy in 2016.

Back then, we decided not to respond further to Soh’s incessant aspersions in kind because we do not stand for, nor identify with, such regrettable behaviour from a fellow athlete.

SNOC’s Letter

We note that the SNOC has served a lawyer’s letter to Soh to “publicly retract and withdraw” his allegations, in light of sworn statutory declarations made by various individuals who had witnessed Ashley slowing down to allow the other runners to catch up during the race.

We are grateful to the SNOC for working through the due processes to follow up with and provide greater clarity on this matter. We are also deeply appreciative of the four honourable individuals who have stepped forward with sworn declarations to stand for what they deeply believe in and know is right.

Unlike those whom Soh claims to be his witnesses (such as Philippines athlete, Rafael Roliquit Jr, who had received coaching advice from Soh, as well as, two other individuals who were Soh’s coaches), we understand that these four individuals are independent witnesses who were prepared to and did in fact make sworn statements of what they saw during the race.

That is the material difference – anyone can say anything you want on social media and get away with untruths and lies, but not so when you make statutory declarations.

Soh’s NON-COMPLIANCE

Based on media reports, Soh has decided not to retract and withdraw his false allegations against Ashley,  and has instead sought to aggravate matters by repeating his allegations in his social media postings.

If the truth is really what Soh seeks, we believe the best way to achieve that would be for Soh to co-operate with the SNOC and its lawyers, and to seek clarity with the SNOC in an amicable manner. It is clear that even when confronted with 4 statutory declarations from witnesses whose accounts contradicts Soh’s allegations, Soh has chosen to turn a blind eye to these sworn-in and factual accounts by insisting that his allegations represent “nothing but the truth”.

Such an approach by Soh only serves as an aggravating factor to his initial conduct of falsely accusing another athlete of lying, and in so doing, has brought the sport into disrepute. Soh’s refusal to retract his false allegations in the face of the 4 statutory declarations is an extension of his willful act of blatant disregard, poor sportsmanship and improper conduct which goes against Singapore Athletics’ Athlete’s Code of Conduct.  

ONEathlete continues to stand by our earlier response on 21 Oct 2018, and
will defer to SNOC’s processes that are ongoing at the moment. We will also examine all legal options available to Ashley in light of current developments.


ONEathlete Team

Tales of a Triathlete #1 – The sun, the sea, and the sand!

BENJAMIN OOI – Stepping out into a light ocean breeze, an air of familiarity swept over me. I reminisced the countless early mornings I spent here as a budding triathlete with SMU Aquathlon. This was where we came to for most of our Swim-Run brick training, more than a couple of races, and featured often in my earlier triathlon exploits.

7AM, CNY Day 2 – Tanjong Beach, Sentosa Island

It has been a while, though, since I was last here.

(c) ONEathlete

I had meant for the day to be a catch-up of sorts with some of my closest supporters (and expert advisers) who had my back as I traveled to Hawaii for the Ironman World Championship in 2017. With that in mind, it was fitting to have this CNY catch-up over an easy run and relaxed swim here at Tanjong Beach.

(c) ONEathlete

Conversations usually begin around our training, recent/upcoming races as we limber up, and it continues to flow as the kilometers unraveled. We vented about injuries, shared the latest in sporting advances, discussed race plans and pretty much everything under the morning sun for an hour, because that’s how a ‘conversational-pace’ session is done right?

(c) ONEathlete

Post-run, we work on our various strengthening exercises on grass then head into the water to cool off and loosen up. It’s my favorite part, perhaps borne out of a childhood of competitive swimming and water polo. There’s something simply so tranquil and pleasant about a lazy backstroke across the bay. Perhaps I am still more at home in the water than on land.

Cooled down and washed up, we completed the morning with a satisfying brunch. In the company of fellow foodies, I had only one concern — just please, good air-conditioning!

(c) ONEathlete

Ben Ooi is an Ironman Triathlete and younger sibling to two national water polo sisters. He qualified to compete in the World Ironman – World Championships 2017 in Kona, Hawaii. The SMU alumnus is currently working in the private sector and would love a South American holiday, anytime.

ONE Turns TWO

3 Feb 2019 – RunONE & ONEathlete celebrated our 2nd year! Both athletes and team members came together to look back on a fulfilling year, as well as look forward toward some of the exciting plans that lie ahead.

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With Chinese New Year just around the corner, it was only fitting that we started the gathering with a lo-hei. As #ONEturnsTWO, it was touching to notice that the community has grown considerably bigger as athletes are joined by their partners, and as staffing expands.

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The cosy setting also afforded many opportunities for athletes to mingle and catch up with one another. It was a welcome respite from ‘business as usual’ and allowed us to get to know one another better as individuals, not just the identity consigned by the sport that we do. At times, conversations would drift back towards the sport that we love and dedicate so much of our time to, as we shared our race plans and training woes as well as how we can support or provide advice through trying times and difficult moments. The point was not lost on each of us at ONE – there is so much more to being an athlete than any national record or personal bests can ever represent. Together, we can help each other achieve much more than any individual ever will.

Thus, we reaffirmed the spirit of family, community and ONEness.

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The candid sharing of concerns, challenges, as well as plans and opportunities was loosely structured to create a comfortable environment to review what went well in 2018, and what we could be done better in the year ahead. It was also an opportune moment for many amongst us to give thanks and be grateful for the advice help we have received. The chocolate cake at the end also marked another momentous occasion for the ONE community, as well as the beginning of another chapter together.

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From all of us at ONE, we wish our readers a happy Chinese New Year in advance, and fellow athletes an exciting and rewarding season ahead!

Runners running past MBS Singapore

4 Ways to run into the New Year

REBEKAH ONG – If this Monday has got you feeling more deflated than ever, there’s nothing wrong with you, and there’s some good science to back that up. The third/fourth Monday of a new year was crowned Blue Monday by psychologist Dr. Cliff Arnall, who devised an actual mathematical formula that factors in weather, debt and time since Christmas, timing of New Year’s resolutions, low motivational levels, and the urgent feeling that you need to take action, on top of the dreaded back-to-work Monday blues that many office workers face. The solution? Don’t turn it into a self-fulfilling prophecy by focusing on the things you can do to boost your health and mood.

At the top of this list would be New Year’s resolutions, which are pretty common things that most people would set at the beginning of the year. Setting goals and targets that you want to achieve in the course of the year often ties in with starting on a clean slate and taking on opportunities to begin a brand new chapter in life. One of the most popular New Year’s Resolutions is to get fit. The definition of being fit is to be in good health and one of the ways to do that is through regular exercise. For many in Singapore, running is a common way to keep fit and for some, this might be their resolution. If this is the case for you, here are some fun ideas to get you started on your journey!

Start small

Plan your weekly run sessions and set a distance goal. Always start small, then slowly progress further. You don’t need to go fast, but go at a comfortable pace, so you won’t get disheartened or stressed the next time you go for your run. Remember to always stick with something comfortable when you are just starting out.

Join a running group

If you are sociable and would like to make new friends, there are always running groups around to guide and help you become stronger in your run journey. Most of the running groups cater to runners of all levels. Do not be intimidated and go with an open mind to learn and improve. Some running groups which you can consider are Superhero Runners, Running Department, Adidas Runners Singapore, and Coffee Tea Runners, which are just a few of many such groups in Singapore.

Join a virtual run

Joining a virtual run is a good way to motivate you to get started on running. Depending on the site that you register at, there are different criteria for completion. One site that you can check out would be 42race.com. They have 2 types of virtual runs. One is a distance challenge where you are given a time period of a month to complete a certain distance. The the other option is like a typical run event which requires that you complete a pre-determined distance within a few days, but you can run anywhere and at your own time. These virtual runs are typically priced reasonably and some even provide a finisher’s medal.

Plan out your race calendar

In Singapore, there are lots of run events to choose from and our race calendar is one of the busiest in the region. Runs like the ever popular 2XU Compression Run and the biggest run on Singapore’s calendar, the Standard Chartered Singapore Marathon, all have different categories and enough goodies to entice you to join. This would be a good time to map out your training and race calendar for the rest of the year and commit yourself to train for them. The race atmosphere will definitely kick things up a notch and provide an entirely different experience from running alone. 

We hope the aforementioned ideas will kick-start your 2019 New Year’s resolutions to keep fit and launch your running journey!

Rebekkah Ong is a fitness junkie and F1 geek. The elegant foodie is almost at every run event! She presents all things in fours!

One Against Cancer!

FIGHT AGAINST CANCER

A true story penned by a caregiver who witnessed the last days of his cancer-stricken granny. 

“Grandmother was a feisty matriarch in her 70s who had raised her 7 children through the Japanese Occupation. Even whilst she’s in hospital garbs, beneath her quiet and unassuming features granny packs a dragon-lady punch. Ironically, and cruelly, so did her brain cancer. We never saw it coming, until it was too late. 

Within a short span, our world would turn into one almost entirely spoken in numbers and timelines (She’s 74, and will be 75 come Jan; Doc places her 1-year survival rate at 45% chance if…). As she became weaker, even these conversations soon became more form than substance.

Granny was ‘brave’ to endure through the intense treatment and its side effects. On rare occasions when she was in better spirits, granny would request to take a walk down the corridor and asked too much of her frail brittle frame. “When I’m well, bring me for a walk downstairs”, she asked of me one evening. I agreed, and she knewIt was the last time I would lie to her. 

Unlike granny, I was, and still am, a runner. Yet, for all the decades and insidious cancerous cells that separated her from me, we had shared the same thirst for freedom that speaks to what is fundamentally a human desire for movement. My runs became a convenient and my only excuse to break down, wear myself down, pump my fists, let tears mix with sweat as they drip down my chin. Most importantly, it gave me a reason, reasons, to relive and remember the courage, passion, joy, and miracle of living.” 

 

CAMPAIGN AGAINST CANCER 

“Cancer does not just hit the old. It has hit my dad when he was in his mid-30s, my sporty university mate, a newly married young girl, 4-year old cute bubbly boy, and even the teenager who was preparing for his O level exams. We need to do our part to raise awareness of our ‘heroes’ and their caregiving families, to support them through their trying times,” says Jed, Co-founder of ONE, when asked about the campaign. Jed had also lost his dad to cancer when he was 3 years old.

Have you lost anyone to cancer? Who were they, and what did they so passionately stood for before cancer veiled their world?

Join #ONEathlete and #ONEteamsg as we honor their memory and celebrate the courage and passion for life, in this #ONEagainstcancer campaign! From now till the 22nd July, you too can post your photos on social media. Post with the hashtag, #ONEagainstcancer to lend weight to our voice!

 

 

 

 

RACE AGAINST CANCER

RAC aims to raise awareness of cancer and the services which Singapore Cancer Society provides and rallies the community to join in the fight against cancer. It also aims to raise funds for cancer treatment subsidies, welfare assistance, cancer rehabilitation, hospice care, cancer screenings, research, public education and cancer support group initiatives.

In its 10th year running, RAC 2018 will be held on 22 July at East Coast Park. It will feature two competitive categories – the 10km and 15km competitive races, as well as a 5km fun run. Prizes will be awarded to the top 10 male and finishers for both the 10km and 15km competitive categories.

Sign up at www.raceagainstcancer.org.sg. Registration closes 9 July 2018.

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AUCTION AGAINST CANCER

If you are not to keen to post or run, there are more ways the one to contribute! You could also contribute by taking part in the auction and donating! Funds raised will help to drive SCS Programmes and Services to minimize cancer and maximize life! ONEathlete Ashley Liew has also donated his SCSM2017 Finisher Medal up for auction!

He hopes to send a ‘plea-reminder’ to his potential buyer/ donor: “I sincerely thank you for your donation. It is truly a blessing not just to receive but also to give out of one’s abundance. Always stay humble while running for a bigger cause, such as for those that are unable to run due to health reasons.” 

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ONE is proud to partner the Singapore Cancer Society (SCS)’s Race Against Cancer (RAC) 2018, as its Official Sports Marketing Partner. 

Income Eco Run’s Inaugural ‘Zero Waste Runner’ Category receives overwhelming support as participants relinquish their finishers’ entitlements

Proud of our #runONE Co-founder & #ONEathlete @mokyingren running for #zerowaste at #incomeecorun2017 
Were you there too? Tag @runoneapp & share with us your photos! Leggo... 

 

(SINGAPORE, 30 April 2017) – Close to 10,000 participants raced the streets this morning towards a ‘Zero Waste’ future at the Income Eco Run (formerly known as the NTUC Income RUN 350, organised by Young NTUC). Runners from all walks of lives participated in various categories- the 21.1km Half Marathon, 10km and the 800m Kids Dash – in support of the common cause and was flagged off at the F1 Pit Building.

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Income Eco Run_21.1km Runners Gearing up for Flag Off

This year’s Income Eco Run saw a special group of 1,500 runners who took their commitment to the ‘green’ cause to the next level by racing as ‘Zero Waste Runners’. These runners opted not to receive their respective finishers’ entitlements (medal for all categories and a finisher’s tee for the 21.1 km Half Marathon category) in a bid to reduce waste. As a result, 87.8kg of fabric and 150kg of metal were saved.

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It was the first time the race introduced the option for runners to race as a ‘Zero Waste Runner’ and it was fully subscribed before registration closed at the start of April.

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Income Eco Run_Dr Mok Ying Ren Racing Through The 21.1km Finish Line.JPG

Double SEA Games Gold Medalist in the Triathlon (2007) and Marathon (2013) events, Mok Ying Ren (Managed by ONEathlete), raced as a ‘Zero Waste Runner’.

He shared, ” I’m very happy that I placed first in the 21.1km local category. I just started training again, so I’m quite pleased with my timing! Running as a ‘Zero Waste Runner’ was actually refreshing to see fewer cups on the road after the race!

I run home after work regularly as part of my longer distance training. And I use my own bottle during these runs just like today. I believe that these efforts, though small, enable us to be environmentally conscious, and helps in the larger-scale-of things towards reducing carbon emissions and zero waste. Doing good is now made simple, isn’t it?”

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As the pioneer of eco-races in Singapore, Income Eco Run adopted eco-friendly practices for different aspects of the race. They included encouraging runners to bring their own bottles (BYO) to reduce the use of plastic bottles and paper cups, giving out post-run e-certificates, producing finisher medals from recycled metal and using bio-diesel fuel for the generators. The event also readily offered sorting cans for trash to be recycled and provided bicycle racks on race day to encourage participates to cycle to the race venue. Participants were also encouraged to carpool or to take the shuttle bus services to the event.

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Reinforcing Income’s commitment for a ‘Zero Waste’ future, a ‘green’ audit, carried out by Green Future Solutions, was conducted today to set environmental benchmarks for improvements year on year. The ‘green’ audit^ focused on two main areas- waste and energy, and the results are targeted to be available by end May.

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Mr Marcus Chew, Income’s Chief Marketing Officer, said: “We set out to take ownership of the race this year to champion a sustainable future, which is aligned to our core business of making insurance not just accessible, but sustainable, for all in Singapore so that we can be more future ready. We are heartened by the level of participation in this ‘green’ run, especially the eager subscription for the ‘Zero Waste Runner’ category. This shows that many of us are ready to do our part for a sustainable future. With the ‘green’ audit, we look forward to doing more for our collective eco cause and to inspire and encourage others to do more to protect our environment.”

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Income Eco Run_Runners with the Eco Run Structure.JPG
The Run today was graced by various ‘green’ partners who flagged off the race alongside Income’s Chief Marketing Officer, Marcus Chew. This included Ms Sharmine Tan, Manager (Environmental Outreach), Singapore Environment Council and Mr Eugene Tay, Executive Director, Zero Waste Singapore. Mr Lee Kheng Seng, Director, Communications and 3P Partnership Division, Ministry of the Environment and Water Resources, said: “The Ministry of the Environment and Water Resources (MEWR) would like to commend NTUC Income on the Income Eco Run 2017 in bringing together runners and environmental enthusiasts with a common goal of moving towards a zero-waste nation. The Ministry supports the ground-up initiative in promoting the Sustainable Singapore Movement and in setting an environmental benchmark for other marathon organisers to emulate.”

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33-year-old Kenyan, James Barmasai who placed first in the 21.1km Open category shared, “I am feeling great about my win! I expected to win because I trained hard for it. The route was well planned.”

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Jasmine Goh, a familiar face in Singapore’s running scene was placed twice in the Income Eco Run by clinching third place in the 21.1km Open category and the 21.1km Local Champion. The 38-year-old said, “Overall my race experience was enjoyable! The Income Eco Run has a great eco positioning this year, too! In terms of my performance, I expected to run well and do my best. It also helped that the weather was great!”

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Runners were brought on a scenic race route as they raced through Gardens By The Bay, Marina Barrage and The Singapore Flyer.

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For more information, please visit www.incomeecorun.sg or https://www.facebook.com/IncomeEcoRun/.

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(c) Photos from Income Eco Run 2017.
As per press release. For enquiries, please direct to ecorun@sprg.com.sg