Feature – RunSG x Under Armour

In April’s RunSG Magazine, ONEathlete Banjamin Quek got on the cover of the online edition. While it was pretty a warm day on the day of the shoot, Banja was really cool about it.

Maybe it’s because he was decked out in the latest UnderArmour qualifier kit which comprised of a running tee with unique hex-shaped pattern that helps to regulate temperatures while exercising. Gone are the days when gyms are too cold for your warm-spirited treadmill runs and the outdoors too hot for your burning pace.

Besides being one of UA’s latest models to be introduced onto the market, the Hovr Infinite shoes also allows users to track distance covered and calories burnt via the UnderArmour mapmyrun app.

Looking back at the opportunities and engagements he’s had with UA thus far, Banja is grateful to have met many new runners and reach out though his personal stories and challenges in running.

Banja’s running journey is not unique (but it’s definitely his favourite!). In his interactions with runners of all levels, he has noticed a commonality across them that speak to a shared desire and commitment to better themselves.

That sense of belonging to a larger community of purpose amidst challenging struggles has motivated Banja to become a better runner, and he hopes his personal stories of overcoming challenges have similarly helped others in their running journey as well.

When asked about what is his motivation in running, Banja said

“I do not see myself as extraordinary or talented. Instead, I am just an ordinary runner but I am always eager to test and push beyond my limits. I hope in doing so, I am able to inspire younger athletes to keep striving for their dreams. As a runner and as a member of ONEAthlete, I feel that we are also role models while seeking to be the best we can be doing what we love most – to be both a faster runner, and a better runner.”

For more of what Banja has to say about his running experience and journey, check out the April edition of RunSG magazine below. All rights reserved by RunSG magazine.

BANJAMIN Quek is a ONEathlete and Under Armour Ambassador. The mid-distance runner majored in business, and is passionate about the environment. He is currently away in Iten, Kenya for training.

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Evan and Shuzhen (c) Image by Adidas Runners

Run for Love

This article was first published on rockay.com on Dec 30, 2018
Main featured image by Adidas Singapore.

DARA MORMILE – The roller coasters we endure in the dating world can sometimes be compared to the twists and turns we confront as runners taking on a new trail or path. We’re excited, cautious, hoping for the best, coping with new conditions and learning how to keep ourselves in control of the situation.

Some athletes choose to put training first, as their priority and prefer to make a commitment to running and fit life instead of hunting for and committing to Mrs. or Mr. Right. Others want to include their mates in the sport to some capacity and are able to share their athletic feats with someone who has the same overall health values. Another percentage of us don’t even care if whoever we’re dating isn’t the type to lace up and join us for the long run.

(c) ONEathlete / Mok Ying Ren

To each their own!

For runners who are passionate and committed to training – and want some passion in their love lives too – the hectic whirlwind of the dating world may require a careful balancing act. There are a couple of possibilities on the spectrum – runners who may have met that special someone at a race or running event, or runners who meet and fall in love with mates that have no interest in the sport altogether! In another scenario, maybe you’ve met someone who wasn’t a runner before and you’ve inspired their athletic muse (and vice versa)!

(c) ONEathlete / Ashley Liew

But how, exactly, does being a runner affect our ability to meet our match and gauge who our ideal mate would be? For runners who are married with children and have found the gracious balance between sports and personal life, you’re already ahead of the game and you’ve probably mastered dividing and compartmentalizing your time. Those still trying to find love in the midst of sticking to a workout routine – and divide their time while finding a mate – can consider the following points when looking for love.

  1. Making time and spending time
  2. Be honest about your expectations
  3. Chemistry and motivation

So, what’s great about having a running mate?
1. The unconditional love for a worn out athlete
2. Knowing how to cope with “Me Time”

Click HERE to read the full article.

(c) Image from Run Leeds

Happy Valentine’s Day 2019!

#RunforLove #RunONEwithLove!

Going the distance brings benefits to one’s mental health

The article was first published on The Straits Times #runwithmok column on 05 Aug 2017. 

 

Many of us are aware of the physical benefits of exercise. Endurance sports, like running, can trim our waistlines, improve our cardiovascular health and lower our risks of chronic diseases like diabetes and high blood pressure. But that is not all that we stand to gain by putting on those running shoes! Through its effects on our brain, running can also sharpen our mind and nurse our heart. 

 

 

1. Stress coping function


Stress is part and parcel of living in Singapore.. If poorly managed, it can eventually lead to disabling mental conditions like depression and anxiety. Many studies have shown that aerobic exercise promotes the release of norepinephrine and serotonin, brain chemicals that can moderate our response to stress. It also allows the secretion of endorphins, a hormone which generates feelings of happiness that is also responsible for our uplifting mood after a long run .


Regular running can also alleviate anxiety. When we run, we learn to focus on our bodies and become more mindful of our surroundings.  Subconsciously we also  improve our breathing pattern and teach  our bodies to relax. The end result?  Less tension and worries  rummaging through our heads, and a more regulated sleep cycle so our body can enjoy a better rest at night

 

 

2. Sharpening cognitive function


Animal studies have shown that aerobic exercise can boost brain cells and improve nerve connections in the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory. High intensity running is found to increase the levels of BDNF (Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor), a protein which is associated with our brain’s capacity to function well. Running has also been found to reduce the risk of dementia in the elderly. A recent study of elderly participants found that those who engage in regular exercise performed better in memory, IQ and mathematics tests compared to those who did not.

 

3. Confidence and character building function


When we look good, we naturally feel even better. Running is a great way to lose weight, which is also linked to positive self-esteem and give us that extra bounce in our step. By changing up your routine, setting training goals and taking part in running events and races, we also learn to overcome physical and psychological challenges along the way. When faced with life setbacks, running can be the healthier alternative to escapism or depression.  

 

lightofhope

 

On that same vein, the organisers of The Light of Hope Run 2017, Touch Community Services, aim to raise the awareness of depression. How apt this is, as running itself provides pertinent benefits against depression. So the next time you feel down, consider going for a run – that extra mile might be what it takes to bring back that smile!


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Dr Aaron Meng

Dr Aaron Meng is a medical doctor who is in advanced training in Psychiatry. He is also an avid runner and has accomplished a 2hr 48min personal best in the marathon event.